Author Archives: zkeaton

Xen Project 2017 Predictions: The Growth and Changes of the Hypervisor in 2017 and More

Embedded systems become virtualized, IoT security concerns continue and the container community diversifies… What else will happen to the hypervisor and beyond in 2017? Two members of the Xen Project, Stefano Stabellini and James Bulpin, provide insight on where the hypervisor is going in 2017 and other virtualization and infrastructure trends to watch out for in this VMblog post.

Future of Xen Project: Video Spotlight Interview with Xen Project’s Chairperson Lars Kurth

Lars Kurth had his first contact with the open source community in 1997 when he worked on various parts of the ARM toolchain. He has since become an open source enthusiasts, worked on several open source communities, and is the chairperson of the Xen Project Advisory Board. He is also the Director of the Xen Project at Citrix.

He recently sat down to discuss why Xen Project software makes sense for the cloud and where the community and technology is heading this year in this short video. Read on for more.

The Xen Project community has flourished and grown throughout the years. The latest release from the Xen Project (Hypervisor 4.6) produced the best quality and quantity of contributors from cloud providers, software vendors, hardware vendors, academic researchers and individuals.

The Xen Project entices new users to join with its high energy and inclusive nature. It periodically hosts hackathons to give developers the opportunity to meet face to face, to discuss development, coordinate, write code, and collaborate with other developers. The Project will have its next hackathon at ARM’s headquarters in Cambridge on April 18 – 19.

Since the Xen Project became a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation tutelage in 2013, the technology has been able to break into a lot of new use cases, most notably automotive and embedded — check out GlobalLogic’s use of Xen on Linux.com if you haven’t read it already. These recent innovations areas have also been very beneficial to traditional Xen Project use cases. For example, Automotive real-time scheduling is not only important for this industry, but server and data centers as they relate to things like online gaming.

From it’s inception, Xen was created for cloud computing — its early work with Amazon AWS allowed the hypervisor to create a great architecture for the cloud. It has since brought on a lot of new members and contributors to help continue to address the current and future needs of cloud computing, and will continue to innovate in new market segments from automotive to Unikernels.

Why GlobalLogic Uses Xen (Overheard at CES)

We were lucky to have the opportunity to meet up with GlobalLogic at CES and talk to them about their Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization. A few years ago, no one understood why the company was demoing hypervisor technology as a part of Nautilus, a set of solution accelerators that includes architectural concepts, a modified Android OS distribution, and advanced UI concepts. Today, however, no one is questioning why they are using virtualization.

As Alex Agizim, CTO of GlobalLogic told us, “People now clearly understand why Xen is needed to implement the functionality that the market demands. The ability to consolidate different systems on a single computer to gain time to market offers tremendous advantages. Virtualization also offers more flexible functionality and all the benefits of an open world, yet the system is very well controlled with security and stability. The Xen hypervisor is the right solution to allow GlobalLogic to accomplish this.”

If you want to learn more about the technology behind Nautilus and how GlobalLogic’s GPU virtualization solution enables multiple domains to share the GPU hardware with no more than a 5 percent overall drop in performance, check out Agizim’s latest byline on Linux.com or better yet, check out this demo.

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Future of Xen Project: Video Spotlight Interview with Citrix’s George Dunlap

In this video, George Dunlap Senior Engineer of Citrix explains how and why Citrix works with the Xen Project, why companies use Xen Project Hypervisor, and new opportunities for the future of this technology.

Citrix Systems designs, develops and markets technology solutions that enable information technology (IT) services. Citrix has always been committed to the community and consistent in its principles of transparency and neutrality, helping the Xen Project maintain its position as one of the leading open source hypervisors.

One of the major benefits of being a part of the Xen Project is the multiplier benefit that comes with contributing code to open source communities. For example, if Citrix contributes 25% of the code, the equivalent of hiring 25 engineers, it receives 100 engineers’ worth of development as part of the Xen Project. This helps Citrix build the most efficient enterprise products possible and also allows the company to take an active role in leading the Xen Project Hypervisor into the future.

How has this collaboration been put into action? Most recently, Xen Project announced its 4.6 release, which was built into Citrix’s XenServer Dundee (this recently entered beta 1).*

As virtualization moves beyond simply being used for services, and expands into networks, mobile, automotive, and more embedded systems, features like isolation for security, lightweight for mobile, and high performance will continue to help Xen Project Hypervisor grow and support the next stage in cloud computing and virtualization. And Citrix will be there to help further this growth.

*XenServer Dundee has not been released and its feature set has not been finalized.