Category Archives: Announcements

Announcements affecting the Xen Project community

Now Accepting Submissions for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017

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We’re excited to announce that registration and the call for proposals is open for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017, which will be held in Budapest, Hungary from July 11-13, 2017. The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit combines the formats of Xen Project Developer Summits with Xen Project Hackathons, and brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users.

Submit a Talk

Do you have an interesting use case around Xen Project technology or best practices around the community? There’s a wide variety of topics we are looking for, including security, embedded environments, network function virtualization (NFV), and more. You can find all the suggested topics for presentations and panels here (make sure you select the Topics tab).

Several formats are being accepted for speaking proposals, including:

  • Presentations and Panels
  • Interactive design and problem solving sessions. These sessions can be submitted as part of the CFP, but we will reserve a number of design sessions to be allocated during the event. Proposers of design sessions are expected to host and moderate design sessions following the format we have used at Xen Project Hackathons. If you have not participated in these in the past, check out past event reports from 2016, 2015 and 2013.

Never talked at a conference before? Don’t worry! We encourage new speakers to submit for our events and have plenty of resources to help you prepare for your presentation.

Here are some dates to remember for submissions and in general:

  • CFP Close: April 14, 2017
  • CFP Notifications: May 5, 2017
  • Schedule Announced: May 16, 2017
  • Event: July 11-13, 2017

Registration

Come join us for this event, and if you register by May 19, you’ll get an early bird discount :) Travel stipends are available for students or individuals that are not associated with a company. If you have any questions, please send a note to community.manager@xenproject.org.

Xen Project Participates in Google Summer of Code and Outreachy

This is a quick announcement that the Xen Project is again participating in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program that awards three-month paid stipends to University students to work on open source projects, with the goal to get open source experience. The Xen Project will also again participate in Outreachy, which is an internship program that organises three-month paid internships with free and open-source software projects for people who are typically underrepresented in the technology industry. Outreachy has been helping women (cis and trans), trans men, genderqueer people and people from other discriminated backgrounds get involved in free and open source software for several years. The Xen Project is proud that it has participated continually in Outreachy (and its predecessor OPW) for 4 years.

I want to participate, how do I get started?

If you are not at all familiar with programs such as GSoC and Outreachy, have a quick look at our introduction. In a nutshell, both programs go through several stages:

  • Check eligibility requirements.
  • Now until application period: Preparation by working on small tasks (also called micro-tasks) within our community to identify a suitable project and to familiarise yourself with the technology.
  • Application Period (aka paperwork): For GSoC, the application system is open from March 20 to Apr 3, 2017; however you should work on micro-tasks before and prepare your application together with a mentor as early as possible. For Outreachy, the application system is already open and will close March 30, 2017 (but you can edit and modify proposals submitted in agreement with your mentor until April 28th).
  • Selection Period: After applying to participate, our mentors will chose the most promising candidates. Successful candidates will be announced on the following dates: April 28 (Outreachy), May 4 (GSoC).
  • Internship Duration: May 30 to August 29 (GSoC) and August 30 (Outreachy).

For a list of projects for participants and more information on how to apply, check our Xen Project 2017 Summer Internship Portal. We have many different projects in many different areas: from Hypervisor work, projects in Mirage OS, to tools and test related tasks. Note that we will be adding extra projects to this page in the coming weeks and that applicants can suggest projects on their own.

You may also want to check out the pages of GSoC mentoring organisations which we collaborate with. Sometimes, you will find Xen related projects there: FreeBSD (currently 2 projects), QEMU, Libvirt.

Learn about the Experience of past Participants

At a past Xen Project Developer Summit, we ran a panel discussion that included Outreachy interns, GSoC students as well as mentors.


You may also want to read Women interns rocking open source at Xen Project.

Request for Comment: Scope of Vulnerabilities for which XSAs are issued

Issuing advisories has a cost: It costs the security team significant amounts of time to craft and send the advisories; it costs many of our downstreams time to apply, build, and test patches; and it costs many of our users time to decide whether to do an update, and if so, to test and deploy it.

Given this, the Xen Project Security Team wants to clarify when they should issue an advisory or not: the Xen Security Response Process only mentions “‘vulnerabilities”, without specifying what constitutes a vulnerability.

We would like guidelines from the community about what sorts of issues should be considered security issues (and thus will have advisories issued). I have posted the second version a draft of a section I am proposing to be added to the Xen Security Policy to xen-devel; a copy is included below for your convenience. There are only minor modifications from the first draft, so barring major feedback from the wider community it will likely achieve consensus. If you want input, now is the time to speak up.

Most of it is just encoding long-established practice. But there are two key changes and / or clarifications that deserve attention and discussion:

    Criteria 2c: Leaking of mundane information from Xen or dom0 will not be considered a security issue unless it may contain sensitive guest or user data

Criteria 4: If no operating systems are vulnerable to a bug, no advisory will be issued.

If you want to weigh in on the question, please join the discussion on xen-devel before 28 February. The title of the thread is “RFC v2: Scope of Vulnerabilities for which XSAs are issued”.

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What’s New with Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8?

I’m pleased to announce the release of the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8. As always, we focused on improving code quality, security hardening as well as enabling new features. One area of interest and particular focus is new feature support for ARM servers. Over the last few months, we’ve seen a surge of patches from various ARM vendors that have collaborated on a wide range of updates from new drivers to architecture to security.

We are also pleased to announce that Julien Grall will be the next release manager for Xen Project Hypervisor 4.9. Julien has been an active developer for the past few years, making significant code contributions to advance Xen on ARM. He is a software virtualization engineer at ARM and co-maintainer of Xen on ARM with Stefano Stabellini.

This release also marks the start of our first 6-month release cycle. Despite the shorter timeframe and putting more thorough security processes in place, we have maintained development momentum for Xen Project Hypervisor.

We’ve also worked with the Debian community to bring Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8 to the upcoming release (codename “Stretch”).

Here are the categories with updates to highlight in 4.8

  • Hypervisor General
  • Hypervisor x86
  • Hypervisor ARM
  • Toolstack
  • Xen Project Test Lab
  • Misc.

Hypervisor General

  • Credit2 scheduler is now supported: Compared to the default Credit scheduler, the Credit2 scheduler is more scalable and better at supporting latency sensitive workloads such as VDI, video and sound delivery, as well as unikernel applications. Credit2 is still based on a general purpose, weighted fair share, scheduling algorithm unlike some of the more specialized Xen Project schedulers such as RTDS and ARINC653.
  • Domain creation time optimisation: An optimisation to TLB flush is introduced to greatly reduce the number of flushes needed during domain creation. This has lead to the reduction of domain creation time for very large domains (with hundreds of gigabytes of RAM) from a few minutes to tens of seconds.
  • XSM policy is refactored and cleaned up: XSM policy files are refactored and cleaned up so that they are better organised and easier to understand. If configured, we can also now attach the in-tree default policy to Xen binary, so there is no need to load the default policy via boot loader.
  • Live Patching hook support: Live Patching is now able to look for the “hooks” section in the payload and execute code from there. This update gives the patch author more control in modifying data and code.

Hypervisor x86

  • CPUID faulting emulation: This makes CPUID fault in HVM userspace program without hardware support.
  • PVCLOCK_TSC_STABLE_BIT support: This greatly improves user space performance for time related syscalls.
  • Intel AVX-512 instructions support: These instructions offer higher performance for the most demanding computational tasks. They represent a significant leap to 512-bit SIMD support. This enables processing of twice the number of data elements that AVX/AVX2 can process with a single instruction and four times that of SSE.
  • PVH v2 DomU ABI is stabilised: The DomU guest ABI for PVH v2, without PCI passthrough support, is stabilised. Guest operating system developers can start porting OSes to this mode, which is simpler and gives them all the goodies that hardware and software provide.

Hypervisor ARM

  • Xen Project 4.8 ARM DomU ACPI support is now able to build ARM64 guests with ACPI support, such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview (available via Partner Early Access Program). It can also run unmodified Xen on ARM.
  • Alternative patching support: This enables the hypervisor to apply workarounds for erratas affecting the processor and to apply optimizations specific to a CPU.
  • Live Patching initial support: Live Patching now supports both ARM32 and ARM64 platforms.
  • Support for Xilinx® Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC: Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8 comes with support for the Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC making it much easier for Xilinx customers to integrate Xen into their solution.

Toolstack

  • Split out and re-license libacpi: The code inside hvmloader to construct guest ACPI tables is split out as a separate library libacpi, which is now shared across x86 and ARM. The code is re-licensed from GPL to LGPL.
  • HVM USB passthrough: It is now possible to passthrough USB devices to HVM guests with the help of QEMU.
  • Load BIOS via libxl: It is now possible to provide arbitrary BIOS binary to the guest making it easier to integrate and test Xen.
  • Libxl device handling framework: The device handling code inside libxl is reworked so that it is more extensible and easier to maintain.

Xen Project Test Lab

  • XTF is integrated into OSSTest: XTF is a micro-VM based test framework. It is now integrated into OSSTest and gates pushing patches to all supported Xen branches. This would help the project identify functional and security regressions more easily and quickly.

Misc.

  • Mini-OS ported to PVH v2: With the stabilization of PVH v2 DomU ABI, we are now confident to port mini-os to that mode. This would serve as an example to port guest OSes to PVH v2, as well as a foundation to more interesting micro-VM based work like building stub domains. The latter (stub domains) is a differentiator to other hypervisors, and could greatly enhance the security and scalability of Xen Project Hypervisor.
  • Mini-OS now supports ballooning up: Ideally, a service domain would need to dynamically adjust the memory it consumes, either voluntarily or via obeying command from hypervisor. This is an important feature to make Mini-OS based service domains more flexible in terms of memory consumption, which is one step towards that goal. Support for ballooning down Mini-OS is under development.

Summary

Despite the shorter release cycle, the community developed several major features, and found and fixed many more bugs. It is also rather impressive to see multiple vendors collaborate on the Xen Project Hypervisor to drive multiple projects forward. Major contributions for this release come from ARM, BitDefender, Bosch, Citrix, Freescale, Intel, Linaro, Oracle, Qualcomm, SUSE, Star Lab, the US National Security Agency, Xilinx, Zentific, and a number of universities and individuals.

Over the last year, contributors with strong security and embedded backgrounds have joined the Xen Project allowing us to  continue to focus on performance and flexibility without sacrificing security and reliability. Xen Project Hypervisor continues to move forward thanks to amazing efforts from companies developing products based on the hypervisor, such as XenServer 7 and Bitdefender Hypervisor Introspection, and novel new developments with Live Patching and Virtual Machine Introspection.

In this release, we took a security-first approach and spent a lot of energy to improve code quality and harden security. This inevitably slowed down the acceptance of new features a bit, but not enough to reach meaningful balance between mature security practice and innovation.

On behalf of the Xen Project Hypervisor team, I would like to thank everyone for their contributions (either in the form of patches, bug reports or packaging efforts) to the Xen Project. Please check our acknowledgement page, which recognizes all those who helped make this release happen.

The source can be located in the http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.8 tree (tag RELEASE-4.8.0) or can be downloaded as tarball from our website. More information can be found at

Please Welcome Our New Release Manager

Dear community members,

I’m pleased to announce that Julien Grall <julien.grall@arm.com> will be the Release Manager for the next Xen release.

The appointment was voted by the Committers and the vote passed.

Julien has done excellent jobs in many aspects. He has been an active  developer for the past few years and contributed a lot of code for Xen on ARM. He has been doing a good job in co-maintaining Xen on ARM with Stefano Stabellini. Particularly in 4.8 release, he showed his ability to make balanced decisions and influence other contributors to move various projects forward. He also expressed desire to work with greater Xen community and make bigger impact.

All in all, we believe Julien will do a good job in managing the next release. Thanks Julien for stepping up.

Regards,
Wei Liu (on behalf of the Xen Project Hypervisor team)

Xen Project Maintenance Releases Available (Versions 4.6.4 and 4.7.1)

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.6.4 and 4.7.1. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.6 and 4.7 stable series update to the latest point release.

Xen 4.6.4

Xen 4.6.4 is available immediately from its git repository http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.6
(tag RELEASE-4.6.4) or from the Xen Project download page http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/supported-xen-46-series/xen-464.html

Xen 4.7.1

Xen 4.7.1 is available immediately from its git repository http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.7
(tag RELEASE-4.7.1) or from the Xen Project download page http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/supported-xen-47-series/xen-471.html

These releases contain many bug fixes and improvements. For a complete list of changes, please check the lists of changes on the download pages.