Category Archives: Events

Information about an industry or Xen Project-specific event

A Recap of the Xen Project Developer Summit 2016

The Xen Project descended on Toronto, Canada in late August for its annual Xen Project Developer Summit. The Summit is an opportunity for developers and software engineers to collaborate and discuss the latest advancements of the Xen Project software. It also gives developers a chance to better understand new trends and deployments in the community and from power enterprise users.

From community growth to new emerging use cases, the Summit covered a lot of ground. Developments within core technologies such as security, graphics support and hardware support were discussed. We also covered emerging technologies such as automotive, embedded and IoT. All sessions were recorded and are available here and also on slideshare (follow this link for summit presentations).

Below is a summary of a few videos that feature technology that has been recently introduced into the Xen Project hypervisor as well as emerging technologies that are being built with Xen Project technology.

New Feature Technologies from Xen Project Community and Power Users

In Xen Project 4.7, we introduced Live Patching as a technology preview. Live Patching gives system administrators and DevOps practitioners the ability to update the Xen Project hypervisor without the need for a reboot. Konrad Wilk, software development manager of Oracle and Ross Lagerwall, software enggineer at Citrix, provide insight into how it works, what the difficulties were to implement, and how it compares to other technologies for patching (kGraft, kPatch, kSplice, Linux hot-patching).

Dimitri Stilliadis, CEO of Aporeto, provides a great overview of the benefits of using Xen Project software to provide an execution environment for Docker apps. This approach allows VM-like isolations for security measures without having to sacrifice performance. The presentation introduces a new paravirtualized protocol to virtualise IP sockets and provides the design and implementation details.

Data breaches are happening all the time, and there are many ways that organisations are trying to stop this through detection, pattern matching and behavioural analysis. However, Neil Sikka, founder and CEO of A1LOGIC, provides a new way of looking at this problem and solving this problem by using the Xen Project hypervisor to enforce data loss prevention. It doesn’t use any type of detection, heuristics, pattern matching or behavioural analysis, but rather a strictly algorithmic approach rooted in hardware.

Embedded Projects and Xen Project Software

Members from the Xen Project sister community OpenXT, an open-source development toolkit for hardware-assisted security research and appliance integration, were present to provide some insights into how Xen Project is working within the embedded space and best practices for embedding Xen Project on mobile and tablet devices.

If this is an area that you are interested in, check out Christopher Clark (consultant and interoperability architect at BAE Systems) overview of the OpenXT Project, which has begun to attract new users and contributors. We also recommend Chris Patterson’s and Kyle Temkin’s step-by-step guide on the challenges and lessons to get Xen Project software started on phones and tablets. Chris is a advising computer engineer for AIS and Kyle is researcher for AIS.

Emerging Technologies

Xen Project is consistently becoming more common within automotive and aviation. Xen Project 4.7 introduced the ability to remove core Xen Hypervisor features at compile time via KCONFIG. This allows a more lightweight hypervisor, which is perfect for IoT scenarios and better for security-first environments, like automotive.

Sangyun Lee, senior embedded software engineer of LG Electronics, presents on the real-time GPU scheduling of XenGT in Automotive Embedded systems. It introduces the real-time GPU schedule of XenGT running on automotive embedded systems and explains why this should be used for an automotive system.

Xen Project is consistently being used within embedded systems for automotive. Earlier this year at CES, GlobalLogic showcased its technology behind Nautilus, which is the company’s virtualisation solution that enables multiple domains to share the GPU hardware with no more than a 5 percent overall in performance changes. More on this technology and how it uses Xen Project here.

The summit was a huge success with many interesting conversations. The Xen Project thanks everyone who attended and presented as well as the sponsors of the event Citrix, Huawei and Intel.

Don’t Miss Xen Project & KVM Joint Reception at LinuxCon

Last year, we really enjoyed co-hosting a hackathon and social event with the KVM community. It spurred really interesting conversations, a bit of friendly competition and some community bonding.

Back by popular demand is another joint KVM community event. Xen Project and KVM are hosting the joint social event at the Hockey Hall of Fame (this is Canada after all) on August 25th during the Xen Project Developer Summit and KVM Forum. The event will be held from 7:00pm to 11:00pm.

xenparty2This will be a great evening for anyone who is attending the Xen Project Developer Summit and KVM Forum, August 25 – 26.


The Hockey Hall of Fame is a ten minute walk from the Westin where LinuxCon and ContainerCon are taking place. There will be plenty of shop talk of course. The Xen Project is increasingly more popular in IoT, automobile and embedded use cases, and a staple open source software in many of the largest companies today.

But there will also be plenty of time to check out the interactive hockey games, amazing hockey memorabilia, food, and drinks. Your badge is required to enter the party.

If you are interested in joining us for the Xen Project and KVM party, you must be attending one of these events. If you haven’t already, registration for the Xen Project Developer Summit is here. A few more highlights include:

  • Porting Xen on ARM to a new SOC with Julien Grall of ARM

  • High-Performance Virtualization for HPC Cloud on Xen with Tianyu Lan and Jun Nakajima of Intel

  • Attack Surface Reduction with Douglas Goldstein of Star Labs

  • Patch Review for Non-Maintainers with George Dunlap of Citrix

  • Xen Scalability Analysis with Weidong Han, Zichao Huang, and Wei Yang of Huawei

Xen Project Community Hosts Annual Developers Summit in August

We recently announced the program and speakers for our Xen Project Developer Summit happening in Toronto, Canada from August 25-26, 2016. The event will be co-located with LinuxCon North America.

The Xen Project hypervisor powers the new needs of computing and virtualization through a rich ecosystem of community members that focus on everything from security, embedded, and web-scale environments. The Summit is an opportunity for developers and software engineers to collaborate and discuss the latest advancements of Xen Project software, and better understand what’s next for Xen Project technology, virtualization and cloud computing.

In addition to presentations, we will be running a half-day hackathon alongside the Summit on the last day. Xen Project hackathons have evolved in format into a series of structured problem-solving sessions that scale up to 50 people.

This flagship event features presentations on the latest developments, best practices, collaboration, product roadmap updates and future planning from developers and users who are leading the way in server density, hardware, automotive, cloud and enterprise security. To view the full schedule and register, please head here:

This event is being sponsored by Citrix (Diamond sponsor), Huawei (Platinum sponsor) and Intel (Platinum sponsor). Please be sure to follow updates on the event via Xen Project’s Twitter, Google+ or Facebook page. Hashtag for the event is #xendevsummit.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Intel hosts OpenXT Summit on Xen Project based Client Virtualization, June 7-8 in Fairfax, VA, USA

This is a guest blog post by Rich Persaud, former member of the Citrix XenServer and XenClient engineering and business teams. He is currently a consultant to BAE Systems, working on the OpenXT project, which stands on the shoulders of the Xen Project, OpenEmbedded Linux and XenClient XT.

While the Xen Project is well known for servers and hosted infrastructure, Type-1 hypervisors have been used in client endpoints and network appliances, improving security and remote manageability. Virtualization-based security in Qubes and Windows 10 is also educating system administrators about hardware security (IOMMU and TPM) and application trust models.

Released as open-source software in 2014, OpenXT is a development toolkit for hardware-assisted security research and appliance integration. It includes hardened Linux VMs that can be configured as a user-facing software appliance for client devices, with virtualization of storage, network, input, sound, display and USB devices. Hardware targets include laptops, desktops and workstations.

OpenXT stands on the shoulders of the Xen Project, OpenEmbedded Linux and XenClient XT. It is optimized for hardware-assisted virtualization with an IOMMU and a TPM. It configures Xen network driver domains, Linux stub domains, Xen Security Modules, Intel TXT, SE Linux, GPU passthrough and VPNs. Guest operating systems include Windows, Linux and FreeBSD. VM storage options include encrypted VHD files with boot-time measurement and non-persistence.

The picture below shows a typical OpenXT software stack, including Xen, Linux and other components.

The picture above shows one of many configurations of the OpenXT software stack, including Xen, Linux and other components.

OpenXT enables loose coupling of open-source and proprietary software components, verifiable measurements of hardware and software, and verified launch of derivative products. It has been used to develop locally/centrally managed software appliances that isolate high-risk workloads, networks and devices.

The inaugural OpenXT Summit brings together developers and ecosystem participants for a 2-day conference in Fairfax, VA, USA on June 7-8, 2016. The event is hosted by Intel Corporation. The audience for this event includes kernel and application developers, hardware designers, system integrators and security architects.

The 2016 OpenXT Summit will chart the evolution of OpenXT from cross-domain endpoint virtualization to an extensible systems innovation platform, enabling derivative products to make security assurances for diverse hardware, markets and use cases.

The Summit includes one day of presentations, a networking reception and one day of moderated technical discussions. Presentation topics will include OpenXT architecture, TPM 2.0, Intel SGX, Xen security, measured launch, graphics virtualization and NSA research on virtualization and trusted computing.

For more information, please see the event website at

For presentations and papers related to OpenXT, please see

Xen Project Hackathon 16 : Event Report

We just wrapped another successful Xen Project Hackathon, which is an annual event, hosted by Xen Project member companies, typically at their corporate offices. This year’s event was hosted by ARM at their Cambridge HQ. 42 delegates descended on Cambridge from Aporeto, ARM, Assured Information Security, Automotive Electrical Systems, BAE Systems, Bromium, Citrix, GlobalLogic, OnApp, Onets, Oracle, StarLab, SUSE and Vates to attend. A big thank you (!) to ARM and in particular to Thomas Molgaard for organising the event and the social activities afterwards.

Here are a few images that helped capture the event:

Taking a breather and photo opp outside of ARM headquarters in Cambridge

Taking a breather and photo opp outside of ARM headquarters in Cambridge

Working on solving the mysteries of the world.

Working on solving the mysteries of the world

Continuing to work hard on solving the mysteries of the world

Continuing to work hard on solving the mysteries of the world

Xen Project Hackathons have evolved in format into a series of structured problem solving sessions that scale up to 50 people. We combine this with a more traditional hackathon approach where programmers (and others involved in software development) collaborate intensively on software projects.

This year’s event was particularly productive because all our core developers and the project’s leadership were present. We focused on a lot of topics, but two of our main themes this year evolved around security and community development. We’ll cover these topics in more detail and how they fit within our next release 4.7 and development going forward, but below is a little taste of some of the other themes of this year’s Hackathon sessions:

  • Security improvements: A trimmed down QEMU to reduce attack surface, de-privileging QEMU and the x86 emulator to reduce the impact of security vulnerabilities in those components, XSplice, KConfig support which allows to remove parts of Xen at compile time, run-time disablement of Xen features to reduce the attack surface, vulnerabilities, disaggregation and enabling XSM (Xen’s equivalent of the Linux Security Modules which are also known as SELinux) by default.
  • Security features: We had two sessions on the future of XSplice (first version to be released in Xen 4.7), which allows users of Xen to apply security fixes on a running Xen instance (aka no need to reboot).
  • Robustness: A session on restartable Dom0 and driver domains, which again will significantly reduce the overhead of applying security patches.
  • Community and code review: A couple of sessions on optimising our working practices: most notably some clarifications to the maintainer role and how we can make code reviews more efficient.
  • Virtualization Modes: The next stage of PVH, which combines the best of HVM and PV. We also had discussions around some functionality that is currently developed in Linux on which PVH has dependencies.
  • Making Development more Scalable: A number of sessions to improve the toolstack and libxl. We covered topics such as making storage support pluggable via a plug-in architecture, making it easier to develop new PV drivers to support automotive and embedded vendors, and improvements to our build system, testing, stub domains and xenstored.
  • ARM support: There were a number of planning sessions for Xen ARM support. We covered the future roadmap, how to implement PCI passthrough, and how we can improve testing for the increasing range of ARM HW with support for virtualization, also applicable outside the server space.

There were many more sessions covering performance, scalability and other topics. The session’s host(s) post meeting notes on xen-devel@ (search for Hackathon in the subject line), if you want to explore any topic in more detail. To make it easier for people who do not follow our development lists, we also posted links to Hackathon related xen-devel@ discussions on our wiki.

Besides providing an opportunity to meet face-to-face, build bridges and solve problems, we always make sure that we have social events. After all Hackathons should be fun and bring people together. This year we had a dinner in Cambridge and of course the obligatory punting trip, which is part of every Cambridge trip.

Embarking on the punting journey

Embarking on the punting journey

Continued exploration of discovering the mysteries of the universe, while on a boat

Continued exploration of discovering the mysteries of the universe, while on a boat

Again, a big thanks to ARM for hosting the event! Also, a reminder that we’ll be hosting our Xen Project Developer Summit next August in Toronto, Canada. This event will happen directly after LinuxCon North America and is a great opportunity to learn more about Xen Project development and what’s happening within the Linux Foundation ecosystem at large. CFPs are still open until May 6th!

Xen Project Starts the New Year with a Bang!

January Features Major Xen Project Activities at Two of the Biggest FOSS Conferences of the Year!

The Xen Project is starting 2016 on a high note by sponsoring major events at both the largest community-run FOSS conference in North America (SCALE) and the world (FOSDEM). In addition to a flurry of technical talks in the main program of each conference, Xen Project is organizing additional co-located events.

Unikernels and More: Cloud Innovators Forum (CIF16) Comes to Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE)

Xen Project is proud to announce the world’s most wide-ranging Unikernel user event ever held! We have a full day of talks which cover everything from the basics of Unikernels to building Unikernels to reworking the cloud to adapt to the realities of Unikernels. We have speakers from some of the biggest research companies (like IBM, NEC, and Ericsson) as well as some of the most leading edge organizations. Just take a look at the talk lineup:

To join us, simply register at the SCALE 14x website.

And all this is in addition to a couple Xen Project talks in the SCALE program itself:

Xen Project talks at FOSDEM

As in past years, the Xen Project will have a booth and demos at FOSDEM and is well represented at FOSDEM Devrooms.

To join us, simply attend FOSDEM (no registration required) and enjoy the talks.