Category Archives: Events

Information about an industry or Xen Project-specific event

Xen Project @ FOSDEM

Going to FOSDEM’15? Well, you want to check out the schedule of the Virtualization & IaaS devroom then, and make sure you do not miss the talks about Xen.

Here they are the talks, in some more details:

Last but certainly not least, there will be a Xen-Project booth, where you can meet members of the Xen community as well as enjoying some demos.

The booth will be in building K, on level 1.

We also have a handy guide available, that you may want to print out before going to the event.

CES 2015: Smart Cars are the New Smart Phone

This is a reprint of the following Linux.com article by Alex Agizim, VP, CTO Embedded Systems at GlobalLogic

“Smart car” technology had a huge presence at CES 2015, from BMW’s 360-degree collision avoidance and parking assist features to Audi’s Human Machine Interface (HMI) that connects to an iPhone or Android device. And with both Apple and Google jumping into the market with their CarPlay and Android Auto IVI systems, the automotive industry is on the brink of some significant changes.

For example, thanks to new developments in open source virtualization, OEMs and car manufacturers are closer than ever to achieving a secure, flexible, robust, and customizable integrated cockpit — one that keeps drivers safe while meeting consumers’ connected car expectations. Already well-known for providing security, stability, and isolation in the datacenter, automotive virtualization is gaining wider attention due to additional hardening and new support for ARM.

While this is certainly exciting, virtualization remains a roadblock to some in the smart car industry. I personally had the opportunity to demonstrate GlobalLogic’s Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization at GENIVI’s CES demo and networking event. Leveraging a TI J6 SoC, I demo’d a dual-screen virtual cockpit with one screen emulating a Linux-powered driver information display, and the other screen emulating an Android-powered IVI system. The entire configuration ran on Xen Project Hypervisor 4.5 with three domains: Dom0 (thin control), DomU (Linux), and DomU (Android).

During the demo, I showcased how Nautilus achieves an overall system boot time of 8 seconds, an early RVC of 1.5 seconds, and secure and reliable peripheral sharing (including GPUs). Most importantly, I demonstrated how even if the Android virtual machine crashes, it has absolutely no influence on the mission-critical Linux virtual machine. With Nautilus automotive software, developers can host a number of VMs that are completely sandboxed from each other, thereby ensuring that all vehicle services will continue to operate even if one specific component fails.


The demo was well-received by GENIVI’s attendees, and I got the impression that many Tier 1 OEMs were thinking about using virtualization in their next-gen platforms. This is a huge milestone because, up until very recently, virtualization had a bad rep in the automotive industry. Previous attempts at virtualization using ARM A9 architecture ultimately failed because there was no hardware support for it. Many were also highly reluctant to use open source technology because it lacked proper compliance to strict auto industry regulations. But with platforms like Nautilus, developers can leverage cutting-edge open source technology that is ISO 26262 certification ready to create secure and reliable automotive virtualization experiences.

In fact, GlobalLogic’s goal is to make Nautilus part of the reference Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) software, an open source project that is developing a common, Linux-based software stack for the connected car. We are also a founding leader for Xen Project’s Embedded and Automotive initiative. GlobalLogic is working to add the Xen-based technology to the AGL spec and is further developing the platform’s real-time scheduling and peripheral sharing features to improve the use of a single physical CPU for multiple guest OSes and peripheral devices. We’ll soon be extending QNX and Tizen IVI 3.0 support to improve the functionality of other features. Finally, we are also expanding Nautilus to support even more SoCs in the next six months, such as Renesas R-Car H2/M2, which offers hardware support for virtualization.

Based on my work with the Nautilus platform and my observations of the general automotive industry, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the first PoCs for automotive virtualization coming out of China and Japan later this year. The momentum behind smart car technology development is very strong right now, and I’m excited to see what happens when automotive OEMs finally start taking advantage of virtualization’s many possibilities.

Xen Project User Summit 2014 Videos Now Available

The Year’s Biggest Xen Project User Event Now Available at Your Desk or On Your Phone

You didn’t make it to this year’s Xen Project User Summit in New York City?  Or you didn’t catch all the sessions you wanted to see because of scheduling conflicts (it happens when you have too much of a good thing…)?  Don’t fret; you can catch up on the action on a computer, tablet, or phone near you!

Most of the sessions can now be viewed in the Presentations and Videos section of the XenProject.org website.  And the few which have not been published (due to sound issues), should be available very soon.

Some Sessions to Check Out Include:


Xen in Openstack – An overview with SUSE Cloud- Alejandro Bonilla from SUSE
Ever want to use Xen Project in OpenStack? See how it functions in the OpenStack-driven SUSE Cloud.
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Xen Project Developer Summit Videos and Slides

It has been a while since we held the Xen Project Developer Summit. All slides have been posted on our slideshare channel (prefixed with XPDS14) and are also available on youtube. Slides and videos are also available on the presentation & video page of our website (again, just search for XPDS14). A few videos are still missing, due to editing issues and will follow shortly.

A few of my personal highlights

Xen 4.4 Retrospective and 4.5 Roadmap

Talk by George Dunlap and Konrad R Wilk covering the how we managed the Xen Project 4.4 release and the 4.5 Roadmap. You may also want to check out information related to our first Xen 4.5 Release candidate.

Xen as High-Performance NFV Platform

Towards Massive Server Consolidation

Although not entirely related, the following talk shows some experiments and improvements to Xen which NEC has performed which allow up to 10K guests to run on a Xen host.

Embedded topics

The following talks were interesting and relevant for new use cases, such as automotive, Xen Project in avionics and similar,

Unikernels and Library OS’es

If you are interested in Unikernels, check out the following talks:

Of course, there are many more. Enjoy!

2 weeks to Xen Project Developer Summit – Chicago 18-19, IL, USA

Only last week, the Xen Project team was at OSCON where we launched Mirage OS 2.0 (event report to follow soon, but in the meantime check out the following sessions Nymote and Mirage, Floss Weekly on Mirage OS and Community War Stories) and now our Developer Summit is just round the corner. As we have seen tremendous community growth in the last 12 months (>30%) and the most feature reach Xen Project Hypervisor release coming up soon, I thought I’d share what you can expect.

xpds14
(click image to go to event website)

What to expect?

Xen Project Developer Summits are packed with highly technical content where the core developers of the Xen Project community come together to discuss the evolution of the Xen Project. The conference is a mixture of talks and interactive sessions in un-conference format (which we call BoFs). Newcomers and those who are interested in the progress and future of the Xen Project, it’s sub projects (Hypervisor on ARM and x86, Upstreams and Downstreams, Embedded and Automotive variants, Cloud Operating Systems such as Mirage OS) usually will get tremendous value from attending the event.

Besides roadmap, feature updates and developer topics, this year features a few themes:

  • Network Function Virtualization
  • Security
  • Performance and Scalability
  • Cloud Operating Systems
  • Topics that are important for automotive/embedded/mobile use-cases, such as Real-time virtualization, certification and ARM support

Why not check out the agenda or watch last year’s sessions to get a sense of what is coming. Note that BoF’s and discussion groups will be published next week.

How to get the most out of the Summit?

Our developer events are designed to help you make connections and to participate. A good way to network are our evening social event and to network during the breaks. Another great way to get the most out of the summit is to submit a BoF/discussion groups about a topic you care about or to participate in a BoF/discussion group. BoF submissions are open until August 11 and the BoF schedule will be published the week before the event. Most of our talks will have an extensive and interactive Q&A portion, which is another way to engage.

Xen at the OpenStack Design Summit

The OpenStack community has recently released the Essex release, which supports XCP and XenServer. A number of vendors have worked at that support including Citrix, Internap and Rackspace Public Cloud. You can find some more information about Xen support in the OpenStack Essex release at this wiki page. If you are interested in what has changed in Xen support fro Essex check out this blog post.

Note that there is a roadmap session on XenAPI support in at the OpenStack Design Summit later today: XenAPI (XenServer/XCP) Folsom Roadmap at 2pm, PST. If you are at the Design Summit and care about Xen support, why not drop in and meet Ewan Mellor, John Garbutt or Renuka Apte.

Of course, project Kronos is almost completed, which will help Xen support in OpenStack. You can find information about XCP-XAPI in Debian in the Debian package repository (for docs see Debian XCP wiki and this tutorial). XCP-XAPI support in Ubuntu is near complete: we are waiting for the XCP-XAPI packages to be synced to Ubuntu (see ticket #962184). Documentation can be found in the manpages and the XCP-XAPI package description.