Category Archives: Events

Information about an industry or Xen Project-specific event

Intel hosts Xen Project Hackathon, April 28-29 in Shanghai

I am pleased to announce the next Xen Project Hackathon to be held this spring.  Although we call it a Hackathon, the event consists of several parallel sessions in which Xen Project developers will create, discuss and review designs and changes that impact Xen’s architecture. We’ll perform code reviews, discuss our future roadmap, work on improving the development process, tackle debug problems in the code base and cover other development related topics. Sessions are very interactive: typically there are no presentations.

Intel-logoThe Hackathon will be hosted by Intel at their Shanghai Zizhu Campus, April 28-29. I wanted to thank Susie Li and Mei Yu from Intel for hosting the Hackathon. Intel has been one of the core contributors to the Xen Project since 2003 and has been contributing many features to the Project. Intel joined the Xen Project Advisory Board in 2013 when the software became a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project. We recently interviewed Donald Dugger, Intel’s Virtualization Architect, to find out why Intel continues to support, contribute and invest in the Xen Project.

What to expect at a Xen Project Hackathon?

The aim of the Hackathon is to give developers the opportunity to meet face-to-face to discuss development, coordinate, write code and collaborate with other developers. Of course, the event will allow everyone to meet in-person and build relationships; to facilitate this, we will have a social event on the evening of the 28th. We will cover many hot topics such as the latest Xen Project Hypervisor 4.6 features, planning for the next Xen Project Hypervisor release, Cloud Integration, Cloud Operating Systems, MirageOS, as well as new opportunities in embedded, mobile, automotive and NFV. But at the end of the day, the community chooses what topics will be covered.

To ensure that the event runs efficiently, each day is divided into several segments. We will have a number of work areas that are labelled with numbers (or other unique identifiers). Each morning will start with a plenary and scheduling session. Every attendee can propose a session, which we will map against a work area and time-slot. This makes it easy for other attendees to participate in projects and sessions they care about. Of course we also encourage attendees to highlight projects they plan to share before the event by adding them to our wiki.

How to Register

Spaces for the Xen Project Hackathon are limited (we can accommodate 50 people). Be sure to request an invitation to the event before our cut-off registration date of April 12th, 2015.

More Information

Catch Xen Project Talks at SCALE 13X, openSUSE Mini-Summit, & LF Collaboration Summit This Week

California Gets Four Opportunities in Four Days at Three Conferences to Hear About Xen Project

February 19-22, 2015 has an assortment of great Xen Project talks.

Folks in Santa Rosa, CA at the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit have two great talks:

LFCollab

Meanwhile, attendees of SCALE 13X and the co-located openSUSE Mini-Summit in Los Angeles, CA have another great pair of talks available:
SCALE

If you can make it to California this coming week, there is a lot of Xen Project knowledge to absorb!

Xen Project @ FOSDEM

Going to FOSDEM’15? Well, you want to check out the schedule of the Virtualization & IaaS devroom then, and make sure you do not miss the talks about Xen.

Here they are the talks, in some more details:

Last but certainly not least, there will be a Xen-Project booth, where you can meet members of the Xen community as well as enjoying some demos.

The booth will be in building K, on level 1.

We also have a handy guide available, that you may want to print out before going to the event.

CES 2015: Smart Cars are the New Smart Phone

This is a reprint of the following Linux.com article by Alex Agizim, VP, CTO Embedded Systems at GlobalLogic

“Smart car” technology had a huge presence at CES 2015, from BMW’s 360-degree collision avoidance and parking assist features to Audi’s Human Machine Interface (HMI) that connects to an iPhone or Android device. And with both Apple and Google jumping into the market with their CarPlay and Android Auto IVI systems, the automotive industry is on the brink of some significant changes.

For example, thanks to new developments in open source virtualization, OEMs and car manufacturers are closer than ever to achieving a secure, flexible, robust, and customizable integrated cockpit — one that keeps drivers safe while meeting consumers’ connected car expectations. Already well-known for providing security, stability, and isolation in the datacenter, automotive virtualization is gaining wider attention due to additional hardening and new support for ARM.

While this is certainly exciting, virtualization remains a roadblock to some in the smart car industry. I personally had the opportunity to demonstrate GlobalLogic’s Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization at GENIVI’s CES demo and networking event. Leveraging a TI J6 SoC, I demo’d a dual-screen virtual cockpit with one screen emulating a Linux-powered driver information display, and the other screen emulating an Android-powered IVI system. The entire configuration ran on Xen Project Hypervisor 4.5 with three domains: Dom0 (thin control), DomU (Linux), and DomU (Android).

During the demo, I showcased how Nautilus achieves an overall system boot time of 8 seconds, an early RVC of 1.5 seconds, and secure and reliable peripheral sharing (including GPUs). Most importantly, I demonstrated how even if the Android virtual machine crashes, it has absolutely no influence on the mission-critical Linux virtual machine. With Nautilus automotive software, developers can host a number of VMs that are completely sandboxed from each other, thereby ensuring that all vehicle services will continue to operate even if one specific component fails.


The demo was well-received by GENIVI’s attendees, and I got the impression that many Tier 1 OEMs were thinking about using virtualization in their next-gen platforms. This is a huge milestone because, up until very recently, virtualization had a bad rep in the automotive industry. Previous attempts at virtualization using ARM A9 architecture ultimately failed because there was no hardware support for it. Many were also highly reluctant to use open source technology because it lacked proper compliance to strict auto industry regulations. But with platforms like Nautilus, developers can leverage cutting-edge open source technology that is ISO 26262 certification ready to create secure and reliable automotive virtualization experiences.

In fact, GlobalLogic’s goal is to make Nautilus part of the reference Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) software, an open source project that is developing a common, Linux-based software stack for the connected car. We are also a founding leader for Xen Project’s Embedded and Automotive initiative. GlobalLogic is working to add the Xen-based technology to the AGL spec and is further developing the platform’s real-time scheduling and peripheral sharing features to improve the use of a single physical CPU for multiple guest OSes and peripheral devices. We’ll soon be extending QNX and Tizen IVI 3.0 support to improve the functionality of other features. Finally, we are also expanding Nautilus to support even more SoCs in the next six months, such as Renesas R-Car H2/M2, which offers hardware support for virtualization.

Based on my work with the Nautilus platform and my observations of the general automotive industry, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the first PoCs for automotive virtualization coming out of China and Japan later this year. The momentum behind smart car technology development is very strong right now, and I’m excited to see what happens when automotive OEMs finally start taking advantage of virtualization’s many possibilities.

Xen Project User Summit 2014 Videos Now Available

The Year’s Biggest Xen Project User Event Now Available at Your Desk or On Your Phone

You didn’t make it to this year’s Xen Project User Summit in New York City?  Or you didn’t catch all the sessions you wanted to see because of scheduling conflicts (it happens when you have too much of a good thing…)?  Don’t fret; you can catch up on the action on a computer, tablet, or phone near you!

Most of the sessions can now be viewed in the Presentations and Videos section of the XenProject.org website.  And the few which have not been published (due to sound issues), should be available very soon.

Some Sessions to Check Out Include:


Xen in Openstack – An overview with SUSE Cloud- Alejandro Bonilla from SUSE
Ever want to use Xen Project in OpenStack? See how it functions in the OpenStack-driven SUSE Cloud.
Continue reading

Xen Project Developer Summit Videos and Slides

It has been a while since we held the Xen Project Developer Summit. All slides have been posted on our slideshare channel (prefixed with XPDS14) and are also available on youtube. Slides and videos are also available on the presentation & video page of our website (again, just search for XPDS14). A few videos are still missing, due to editing issues and will follow shortly.

A few of my personal highlights

Xen 4.4 Retrospective and 4.5 Roadmap

Talk by George Dunlap and Konrad R Wilk covering the how we managed the Xen Project 4.4 release and the 4.5 Roadmap. You may also want to check out information related to our first Xen 4.5 Release candidate.

Xen as High-Performance NFV Platform

Towards Massive Server Consolidation

Although not entirely related, the following talk shows some experiments and improvements to Xen which NEC has performed which allow up to 10K guests to run on a Xen host.

Embedded topics

The following talks were interesting and relevant for new use cases, such as automotive, Xen Project in avionics and similar,

Unikernels and Library OS’es

If you are interested in Unikernels, check out the following talks:

Of course, there are many more. Enjoy!