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Now Accepting Submissions for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017

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We’re excited to announce that registration and the call for proposals is open for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017, which will be held in Budapest, Hungary from July 11-13, 2017. The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit combines the formats of Xen Project Developer Summits with Xen Project Hackathons, and brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users.

Submit a Talk

Do you have an interesting use case around Xen Project technology or best practices around the community? There’s a wide variety of topics we are looking for, including security, embedded environments, network function virtualization (NFV), and more. You can find all the suggested topics for presentations and panels here (make sure you select the Topics tab).

Several formats are being accepted for speaking proposals, including:

  • Presentations and Panels
  • Interactive design and problem solving sessions. These sessions can be submitted as part of the CFP, but we will reserve a number of design sessions to be allocated during the event. Proposers of design sessions are expected to host and moderate design sessions following the format we have used at Xen Project Hackathons. If you have not participated in these in the past, check out past event reports from 2016, 2015 and 2013.

Never talked at a conference before? Don’t worry! We encourage new speakers to submit for our events and have plenty of resources to help you prepare for your presentation.

Here are some dates to remember for submissions and in general:

  • CFP Close: April 14, 2017
  • CFP Notifications: May 5, 2017
  • Schedule Announced: May 16, 2017
  • Event: July 11-13, 2017

Registration

Come join us for this event, and if you register by May 19, you’ll get an early bird discount :) Travel stipends are available for students or individuals that are not associated with a company. If you have any questions, please send a note to community.manager@xenproject.org.

How To Shrink Attack Surfaces with a Hypervisor

A software environment’s attack surface is defined as the sum of points in which an unauthorized user or malicious adversary can enter or extract data. The smaller the attack surface, the better. Linux.com recently sat down with Doug Goldstein (https://github.com/cardoe or @doug_goldstein) to discuss how companies can use hypervisors to reduce attack surfaces and why the Xen Project hypervisor is a perfect choice for security-first environments. Doug is a principal software engineer at Star Lab, a company focused on providing software protection and integrity solutions for embedded systems.

You can read the full interview here.

Xen Project Maintenance Releases Available (Versions 4.6.4 and 4.7.1)

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.6.4 and 4.7.1. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.6 and 4.7 stable series update to the latest point release.

Xen 4.6.4

Xen 4.6.4 is available immediately from its git repository http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.6
(tag RELEASE-4.6.4) or from the Xen Project download page http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/supported-xen-46-series/xen-464.html

Xen 4.7.1

Xen 4.7.1 is available immediately from its git repository http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.7
(tag RELEASE-4.7.1) or from the Xen Project download page http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/supported-xen-47-series/xen-471.html

These releases contain many bug fixes and improvements. For a complete list of changes, please check the lists of changes on the download pages.

Xen Project 4.5.5 Maintenance Release is Available

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.5.5. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.5 stable series update to this point release.

Xen 4.5.5 is available immediately from its git repository:

    xenbits.xenproject.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.5
    (tag RELEASE-4.5.5)

or from the Xen Project download page at www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/xen-45-series/xen-455.html.

This release contains many bug fixes and improvements. For a complete list of changes in this release, please check the lists of changes on the download page.

We recommend all users of the 4.5 stable series to update to this latest point release.

Q&A: Xen Project Release Strengthens Security and Pushes New Use Cases

The following Q&A with Lars Kurth, the Xen Project chairperson, was first published on Linux.com.

Xen Project technology supports more than 10 million users and is a staple in some of the largest clouds in production today, including Amazon Web Service, Tencent, and Alibaba’s Aliyun. Recently, the project announced the arrival of Xen Project Hypervisor 4.7. This new release focuses on improving code quality, security hardening and features, and support for the latest hardware. It is also the first release of the project’s fixed-term June – December release cycles. The fixed-term release cycles provide more predictability making it easier for consumers of Xen to plan ahead.

We recently sat down with the Xen Project chairperson, Lars Kurth, to talk about some of the key features of the release and the future of Xen Project technology. Lars will be discussing this topic and more during Xen Project’s Developer Summit in Toronto, CA from August 25-26 — the conference is directly after LinuxCon North America.

Q: What was the focus on this release?

Lars Kurth: There were five areas that we focused on for this release (full details are in our blog). In summary, we focused on security features, migration support, performance and workloads, support for new hardware features, and drivers and devices (Linux, FreeBSD and other).

Security is consistently something that we focus on in all of our releases. There are a lot of people that rely on Xen Project technology and security is our top concern in any release as well as how we organize our process around security disclosures.

Q: What was the biggest feature coming out of this release?

Lars: The biggest feature for us is live patching, which is a technology that enables re-boot free deployment for security patches to minimize disruption and downtime during security upgrades for cloud admins. It essentially eliminates all cloud reboots, making cloud providers and their users much more safe. It also eliminates a lot of headaches for system and DevOps admins of the world.

Q: Xen is often associated with the cloud, but are there additional use cases that you see growing around this technology, if so why?

Lars: We are seeing a lot of growth in terms of contributions, as well as many different use cases emerging, including automotive, aviation, embedded scenarios, security, and also IoT. In addition, we continue to grow within the public cloud sector and traditional server virtualization.

On the security front, for example, a number of vendors such as A1Logic, Bitdefender, Star Lab and Zentific have released or are working on new Xen Project-based security solutions. In addition, the security focused and Xen-based OpenXT project has started to work more closely with the Xen Project community.

Long-time contributors to the Xen Project, such as DornerWorks – a premier provider of electronic engineering services for the aerospace, medical, automotive, and industrial markets – have expanded their scope and are now providing support for the Xen Xilinx Zynq Distribution targeting embedded use-cases. We have also seen an increasing number of POCs and demos of automotive solutions, which include Xen as a virtualization solution.

Growth in these sectors is largely due to the Xen Project’s flexibility, extensibility, customisability and a clear lead when it comes to security-related technologies. Over the last year, we have also seen contributions increase from developers with strong security and embedded backgrounds. In fact, this totaled nearly 17 percent of the overall contributions in this release cycle, up from 9 percent in the previous release.

Q: How did you address these uses cases in this latest release?

Lars: We introduced the ability to remove core Xen Project Hypervisor features at compile via KCONFIG. This creates a more lightweight hypervisor and eliminates extra attack surfaces that are beneficial in security-first environments and microservice architectures. Users will still be able to get the core hypervisor functions, but they won’t receive all the drivers, schedulers, components or features that might not fit their use case.

Essentially it gives people an “a la carte” feature set. They can decide what they need for compliance, safety or performance reasons.

Q: Were there any new contributors for this release that surprised you?

Lars: We had three new companies contributing to the project: Star Lab, Bosch and Netflix. I met engineers from Star Lab for the first time at the 2015 Developer Summit less than a year ago, and helped introduce them to the Project’s culture. In that short period of time, Doug Goldstein from Star Lab has moved into the top five contributors and top 10 code reviewers for the Project.

I was surprised about Netflix’s contributions; I didn’t even know the company used Xen. Netflix improved and secured the VPMU feature, which is incredibly useful for system tuning and performance monitoring. Bosch Car Multimedia GmbH added some new ARM functionality. In addition, we have seen quite a bit of Xen related development in upstream and downstream projects such as Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, QEMU and Libvirt.

Q: What’s next for Xen Project? Where do you think the technology is heading in the future and why?

Lars: In the last three releases, we introduced several major new features such as PVH, COLO, new schedulers, VMI, Live Patching, Graphics Virtualization, etc. and significant re-work of existing features such as Migration and the Xen Security Modules (XSM). Looking at trends within the community, I expect that stepwise evolution of large new features to continue.

Some new capabilities, such as restartable Dom0’s, and additional techniques to provide more isolation and security, are also likely to appear. In addition, it looks likely that we will see some GPU virtualization capabilities for GPUs that target the ARM ecosystem, although it is not yet clear whether these will be available as open source. I also expect that both Intel and ARM hardware features will be closely tracked.

Some areas, such as new schedulers, XSM, PVH and Live Patching, will see significant efforts to harden and improve existing functionality. The goal is to ensure their swift adoption in commercial products and Linux and BSD distributions. Some features, which are not enabled by default are likely to become part of the Xen Project Hypervisor’s default configuration.

Call For Participation for the Xen Project Developer Summit in Toronto

XPDS16

Now Accepting Submissions Through May 6

We’re excited to announce the call for speaking proposals for Xen Project Developer Summit 2016, which will be held in Toronto, Canada, August 25-26, 2016. The Xen Project Developer Summit brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users for their annual developer conference. The summit will be co-located with a number of other events, including LinuxCon, ContainerCon, KVM Forum and Linux Security Summit.

To get a sense of past accepted submissions, check out last years presentations. Accepted speakers will be notified by May 27th. The schedule will be announced on June 3rd.

Birds of a Feather Sessions & Discussion Groups

This year, we will again have space for Birds of a Feather Sessions & Discussion Groups, which are in-depth interactive discussions that allow for collaboration between Xen Project developers and community members. We will publish how you can request a BoF closer to the event. In the meantime, here are the ground rules BoFs:

  • Each BoF host will get 3-5 minutes (depending on the number of BoFs on the day) to pitch your BoF to the entire audience. Slides are not allowed.
  • After we publish the Xen Project Developer schedule, community members that have registered for the summit can submit a request to host a BoF (specifying a couple of slots in preference order)
  • BoFs are small discussion groups, not presentations. You are expected to take notes (or nominate an attendee to do so) and post discussion notes on one of our mailing lists after the summit.

Developer Meeting

I am also pleased to announce that we will also be hosting a 1/2 day Xen Project Developer Meeting the day before the Xen Project Developer Summit (space is limited). The event is open to all members of the Developer Community. More details will follow soon.

Where to stay at the summit

Discounted hotels are listed at the event website at the price of CAD $209.00 per night. Reservations have to be made by July 29th. We are sharing a room block with other Linux Foundation events, so please book early.