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Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Mike Latimer

The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

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Name: Mike Latimer
Title: Senior Engineering Manager, Virtualization Team
Company: SUSE

When did you start contributing to the Xen Project?
I first started working with the Xen Project in 2006 as a backline support engineer for SUSE. That role required working closely with SUSE’s virtualization development team to identify, debug and resolve Xen related issues our customers encountered. At that time, I was a silent contributor to the project as I leveraged the various Xen Project community mailing lists to increase my understanding of the project and contributed back through my engagements with our internal Xen developers. Some years later, I moved to engineering and worked directly with the Xen Project and related tooling. I now manage SUSE’s Virtualization Team and contribute through my own coding and QA related efforts, and also by ensuring our engineers have the resources they need to be active in the Xen Project.

How does contributing to the Xen Project benefit your company?
The Xen Project is an example of a very complex project which is successful due to a thriving and diverse community. Our membership in this community provides engineers an incredible opportunity to increase their own skills through peer review of their code, and directly observing how other engineers approach and resolve problems. This interaction between highly skilled engineers results in better engineers and better engineered products. In other words, it’s a win all around. SUSE benefits both by having a quality product we can offer to our customers and by the continual improvement our engineers experience.

How does the Xen Project’s technology help your business?
Internally, SUSE (and our parent company Micro Focus) relies on all forms of virtualization to provide many critical infrastructure components. Key services such as dns/dhcp servers, web servers, and various applications servers are commonly ran in Xen VMs. Additionally, Xen is an important part of the tooling used to build our distributions. For example, the well known Open Build Service infrastructure (which performs automated building of RPMs) uses Xen VMs for a portion of the builds.

SUSE prides itself on providing quality products that our customers need to resolve real-world challenges. Xen was doing this when we first included it in SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 (in 2006), and continues to do this today as Xen will be included in SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 (to be released in 2018). Xen has been an important differentiating factor with our distribution, and customer feedback has verified the value that they see in this offering.

What are some of the major changes you see with virtualization and the transition to cloud native computing?
In my opinion, the death of the hypervisor has been greatly exaggerated. While it is true that cloud computing has taken users one step away from the hypervisor, the role of the hypervisor has never been more important. As more and more applications move to cloud-based services, the underlying hypervisor will be expected to “just work” with everything required by those applications. This means that advanced functionality like device-passthrough, NUMA optimizations, and support for the latest CPU instructions will be expected to be available in cloud environments.

Of course, security is of paramount importance, and performance can’t be sacrificed either. Meeting these expectations, while continuing to provide core functionality (such as live migration, save/restore, snapshots, etc.) will be challenging, but the architecture of the Xen Project provides the stable foundation for today’s requirements, and the flexibility to adapt to new requirements as the cloud world continues to evolve.

What advice would you give someone considering contributing to the Xen Project?
I would encourage anyone working with the Xen Project to become an _active_ member of the community. Start by following the mailing lists and joining in the conversation. It may seem intimidating to begin working with such a technically complex project, but the community is accepting and interested in what anyone has to say. Even if your contribution are simply ACK’ing patches, or providing test reports, all input is appreciated.

If you are considering submitting code to the project, my advice is to submit early and submit often! Engage with the community early in the development process to allow time for the community to feel joint ownership for the success of your code. Don’t be afraid of criticism, and don’t be afraid of standing up for your point of view. The Xen Project thrives with these discussions, and the outcome should never be viewed as a win/lose proposition. Everyone benefits when the most correct solution wins.

What excites you most about the future of Xen?
I’m most interested in seeing Xen continue to differentiate itself from other hypervisor offerings. The Xen architecture is ideal for environments which require high security and performance, so I’m particularly interested in advances in this area. The convergence of PV

and HVM guest models (into PVH and PVHVM) has been an exciting recent change, and there should be further advances which ensure both guest models are as performant as possible. I’m also looking forward to increases in fault tolerance through such things as a restartable dom0, and better support for driver stub domains. By continuing to improve in these areas, Xen will remain a strong choice in the ever changing field of virtualization.

 

Automotive, Security and the Future of the Xen Project at The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit

The Xen Developer and Design Summit schedule is now live! This conference combines the formats of the Xen Project Developer Summits with the Xen Project Hackathons. If you are part of the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users, come join us in Budapest, Hungary, July 11 – 13 for this must-attend event!

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The conference will cover many different topic areas including community, embedded/automotive, performance, tooling, hardware, security and more. The format will include traditional panels and presentation, as well as design and problem solving sessions.

Design and problem solving session proposals will be accepted until July 7. This is a great way to meet other developers face-to-face to:

  • Discuss and advance the design and architecture of future functionality
  • Coordinate and plan upcoming features
  • Discuss and share best practices and ideas on how to improve community collaboration
  • Hear interactive sessions covering lessons learned from contributors, users and vendor

Submit your design and problem solving ideas here.

Keynotes this year are coming from Lars Kurth, Xen Project Chairperson and Director of Open Source Solutions at Citrix; Oleksandr Andrushchenko, Lead Software Engineer at EPAM Systems; Stefano Stabellini, Virtualization Architect at Aporeto; and Wei Liu, Senior Software Engineer at Citrix.

Here’s a small sampling of other speaking sessions during the conference:

Automotive

  • Dedicated Secure Domain as an Approach for Certification of Automotive Sector Solutions from Iurii Mykhalskyi of GlobalLogic
  • Harmony of CPU Scheduling Between RT Guest OS and Rich Guest OS in Automotive Virtualization from Sangyun Lee of LG Electronics

Security

  • Hypervisor-Based Security: Bringing Virtualized Exceptions Into the Game from Mihai Dontu of Bitdefender
  • Uniprof: Transparent Unikernel Performance Profiling and Debugging from Florian Schmidt of NEC

Future of Xen

  • Intel GVT-g: From Production to Upstream from Zhi Wang of Intel
  • Recent and Ongoing Xen Related Work in the Linux Kernel from Jürgen Groß of SUSE

General Hypervisor

  • Bring up PCI Passthrough on ARM from Julien Grall of ARM
  • EFI Secure Boot, Shim and Xen: Current Status of Developments from Daniel Kiper of Oracle

You can view the entire schedule here. Early bird specials for tickets (price is $250) are available until May 31st.

A special thank you to our Diamond Sponsor Citrix and Gold sponsors ARM, Intel and Superfluidity. We look forward to seeing you at the event in July, and please stay informed on Xen Project updates by following us on social (Twitter and Facebook) and registering to our xen-announce mailing list.

 

Now Accepting Submissions for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017

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We’re excited to announce that registration and the call for proposals is open for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017, which will be held in Budapest, Hungary from July 11-13, 2017. The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit combines the formats of Xen Project Developer Summits with Xen Project Hackathons, and brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users.

Submit a Talk

Do you have an interesting use case around Xen Project technology or best practices around the community? There’s a wide variety of topics we are looking for, including security, embedded environments, network function virtualization (NFV), and more. You can find all the suggested topics for presentations and panels here (make sure you select the Topics tab).

Several formats are being accepted for speaking proposals, including:

  • Presentations and Panels
  • Interactive design and problem solving sessions. These sessions can be submitted as part of the CFP, but we will reserve a number of design sessions to be allocated during the event. Proposers of design sessions are expected to host and moderate design sessions following the format we have used at Xen Project Hackathons. If you have not participated in these in the past, check out past event reports from 2016, 2015 and 2013.

Never talked at a conference before? Don’t worry! We encourage new speakers to submit for our events and have plenty of resources to help you prepare for your presentation.

Here are some dates to remember for submissions and in general:

  • CFP Close: April 14, 2017 (correction: was extended to April 21)
  • CFP Notifications: May 5, 2017
  • Schedule Announced: May 16, 2017
  • Event: July 11-13, 2017

Registration

Come join us for this event, and if you register by May 19, you’ll get an early bird discount 🙂 Travel stipends are available for students or individuals that are not associated with a company. If you have any questions, please send a note to community.manager@xenproject.org.

How To Shrink Attack Surfaces with a Hypervisor

A software environment’s attack surface is defined as the sum of points in which an unauthorized user or malicious adversary can enter or extract data. The smaller the attack surface, the better. Linux.com recently sat down with Doug Goldstein (https://github.com/cardoe or @doug_goldstein) to discuss how companies can use hypervisors to reduce attack surfaces and why the Xen Project hypervisor is a perfect choice for security-first environments. Doug is a principal software engineer at Star Lab, a company focused on providing software protection and integrity solutions for embedded systems.

You can read the full interview here.

Xen Project Maintenance Releases Available (Versions 4.6.4 and 4.7.1)

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.6.4 and 4.7.1. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.6 and 4.7 stable series update to the latest point release.

Xen 4.6.4

Xen 4.6.4 is available immediately from its git repository http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.6
(tag RELEASE-4.6.4) or from the Xen Project download page http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/supported-xen-46-series/xen-464.html

Xen 4.7.1

Xen 4.7.1 is available immediately from its git repository http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.7
(tag RELEASE-4.7.1) or from the Xen Project download page http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/supported-xen-47-series/xen-471.html

These releases contain many bug fixes and improvements. For a complete list of changes, please check the lists of changes on the download pages.

Xen Project 4.5.5 Maintenance Release is Available

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.5.5. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.5 stable series update to this point release.

Xen 4.5.5 is available immediately from its git repository:

    xenbits.xenproject.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.5
    (tag RELEASE-4.5.5)

or from the Xen Project download page at www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/xen-45-series/xen-455.html.

This release contains many bug fixes and improvements. For a complete list of changes in this release, please check the lists of changes on the download page.

We recommend all users of the 4.5 stable series to update to this latest point release.