Call For Participation for the Xen Project Developer Summit in Toronto

XPDS16

Now Accepting Submissions Through May 6

We’re excited to announce the call for speaking proposals for Xen Project Developer Summit 2016, which will be held in Toronto, Canada, August 25-26, 2016. The Xen Project Developer Summit brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users for their annual developer conference. The summit will be co-located with a number of other events, including LinuxCon, ContainerCon, KVM Forum and Linux Security Summit.

To get a sense of past accepted submissions, check out last years presentations. Accepted speakers will be notified by May 27th. The schedule will be announced on June 3rd.

Birds of a Feather Sessions & Discussion Groups

This year, we will again have space for Birds of a Feather Sessions & Discussion Groups, which are in-depth interactive discussions that allow for collaboration between Xen Project developers and community members. We will publish how you can request a BoF closer to the event. In the meantime, here are the ground rules BoFs:

  • Each BoF host will get 3-5 minutes (depending on the number of BoFs on the day) to pitch your BoF to the entire audience. Slides are not allowed.
  • After we publish the Xen Project Developer schedule, community members that have registered for the summit can submit a request to host a BoF (specifying a couple of slots in preference order)
  • BoFs are small discussion groups, not presentations. You are expected to take notes (or nominate an attendee to do so) and post discussion notes on one of our mailing lists after the summit.

Developer Meeting

I am also pleased to announce that we will also be hosting a 1/2 day Xen Project Developer Meeting the day before the Xen Project Developer Summit (space is limited). The event is open to all members of the Developer Community. More details will follow soon.

Where to stay at the summit

Discounted hotels are listed at the event website at the price of CAD $209.00 per night. Reservations have to be made by July 29th. We are sharing a room block with other Linux Foundation events, so please book early.

Xen Project 4.6.1 Maintenance Release is Available

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.6.1. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy: this means we make one new point release per stable series every 4 months, which include back-ports of bug-fixes and security issues.

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.6.1. This is available immediately from its git repository

http://xenbits.xen.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.6
(tag RELEASE-4.6.1)

or from the XenProject download page

http://www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/xen-46-series/xen-461.html
(where a list of changes can also be found).

Note that, as also mentioned on the web page above, due to two oversights the fixes for both XSA-155 and XSA-162 have only been partially applied to this release. (Note further that the same applies to the recently announced 4.4.4 release.)

We recommend all users of the 4.6 stable series to update to this first point release.

Additional note published Feb 17th: We detected the missing patches before the official release, but towards the end of the release process. We then had a discussion whether to make a new release which would have forced us to skip a release number (aka move from 4.6.0 to 4.6.1.1 or 4.6.2) or release 4.6.1 with two security patches which were incomplete, and document what is missing. At this point, we had to decide whether to re-tag (and thus re-number the release) or whether to document any issues. A similar issue happened in 2013, when we released Xen 4.1.6.1 instead of Xen 4.1.6. At that time it became clear that many consumers of Xen have difficulties with a version number that does not fit into the normal version numbering pattern, which led to Xen 4.1.6.1 not being widely used. We cannot re-spin a release without changing the version number if issues are discovered late during the release process. Firstly, making a release involves both extensive testing and also has a security dimension. Normally, after testing succeeds we create a signed tag in the git tree. This means that there is a secure way of accounting for where the tarball came from. We then rebuild and do additional testing, write the release notes, do some more checking and sign the tarballs. The missing patches were discovered on Thursday, before the official release on Monday, but after we created the signed tag. Signed tags cannot be removed, as they have to be tamper proof, which makes everyone more secure.

Future of Xen Project: Video Spotlight Interview with Xen Project’s Chairperson Lars Kurth

Lars Kurth had his first contact with the open source community in 1997 when he worked on various parts of the ARM toolchain. He has since become an open source enthusiasts, worked on several open source communities, and is the chairperson of the Xen Project Advisory Board. He is also the Director of the Xen Project at Citrix.

He recently sat down to discuss why Xen Project software makes sense for the cloud and where the community and technology is heading this year in this short video. Read on for more.

The Xen Project community has flourished and grown throughout the years. The latest release from the Xen Project (Hypervisor 4.6) produced the best quality and quantity of contributors from cloud providers, software vendors, hardware vendors, academic researchers and individuals.

The Xen Project entices new users to join with its high energy and inclusive nature. It periodically hosts hackathons to give developers the opportunity to meet face to face, to discuss development, coordinate, write code, and collaborate with other developers. The Project will have its next hackathon at ARM’s headquarters in Cambridge on April 18 – 19.

Since the Xen Project became a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation tutelage in 2013, the technology has been able to break into a lot of new use cases, most notably automotive and embedded — check out GlobalLogic’s use of Xen on Linux.com if you haven’t read it already. These recent innovations areas have also been very beneficial to traditional Xen Project use cases. For example, Automotive real-time scheduling is not only important for this industry, but server and data centers as they relate to things like online gaming.

From it’s inception, Xen was created for cloud computing — its early work with Amazon AWS allowed the hypervisor to create a great architecture for the cloud. It has since brought on a lot of new members and contributors to help continue to address the current and future needs of cloud computing, and will continue to innovate in new market segments from automotive to Unikernels.

Xen Project 4.4.4 Maintenance Release is Available

I am pleased to announce the release of Xen 4.4.4. Xen Project Maintenance releases are released in line with our Maintenance Release Policy. We recommend that all users of the 4.4 stable series update to this point release.

Xen 4.4.4 is available immediately from its git repository:

    xenbits.xenproject.org/gitweb/?p=xen.git;a=shortlog;h=refs/heads/stable-4.4
    (tag RELEASE-4.4.4)

or from the Xen Project download page at www.xenproject.org/downloads/xen-archives/xen-44-series/xen-444.html.

This release contains many bug fixes and improvements. For a complete list of changes in this release, please check lists of changes on the download page.

Note that this is the last Xen Project coordinated release of the 4.4 stable series. The tree will be switched to security only maintenance mode after this release.

Why GlobalLogic Uses Xen (Overheard at CES)

We were lucky to have the opportunity to meet up with GlobalLogic at CES and talk to them about their Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization. A few years ago, no one understood why the company was demoing hypervisor technology as a part of Nautilus, a set of solution accelerators that includes architectural concepts, a modified Android OS distribution, and advanced UI concepts. Today, however, no one is questioning why they are using virtualization.

As Alex Agizim, CTO of GlobalLogic told us, “People now clearly understand why Xen is needed to implement the functionality that the market demands. The ability to consolidate different systems on a single computer to gain time to market offers tremendous advantages. Virtualization also offers more flexible functionality and all the benefits of an open world, yet the system is very well controlled with security and stability. The Xen hypervisor is the right solution to allow GlobalLogic to accomplish this.”

If you want to learn more about the technology behind Nautilus and how GlobalLogic’s GPU virtualization solution enables multiple domains to share the GPU hardware with no more than a 5 percent overall drop in performance, check out Agizim’s latest byline on Linux.com or better yet, check out this demo.

IMG_20160107_192243524 (1).jpg

ARM hosts Xen Project Hackathon, April 18-19 in Cambridge, UK

I am pleased to announce the next Xen Project Hackathon. The Hackathon will be hosted by ARM in their Cambridge Headquarters from April 18 and 19. I wanted to thank Philippe Robin and Thomas Molgaard from ARM for hosting the Hackathon.

ARMARM designs technology that is at the heart of advanced digital products and has built a broad partner community that increasingly embraces an open source and collaborative development model to keep pace with transitions in the industry. Enabling developer collaboration on open source projects, like Xen, is key to help optimize support for system virtualization. ARM is pleased to host and support this event.

What to expect at a Xen Project Hackathon?

The aim of the Hackathon is to give developers the opportunity to meet face to face, to discuss development, coordinate, write code, and collaborate with other developers. And, of course, the event will allow everyone to meet in person and build relationships. To facilitate this, we will have a social event on the evening of the 18th. We will cover many hot topics such as the latest Xen Project Hypervisor 4.7 features, planning for the next Xen Project Hypervisor release, Cloud Integration, Cloud Operating Systems, Mirage OS as well as Xen Project in emerging segments such as embedded, mobile, automotive and NFV. But, at the end of the day, the community will chose the topics that are covered — more on our process here below.

To ensure that the event runs efficiently, we adhere to the following process: Each day is divided into several segments. We will have a number of work areas that are labelled with numbers (or other unique identifiers). Each morning starts with a plenary and scheduling session. Every attendee who cares about a topic can announce a topic, which we will map against a work area and time-slot. This makes it easy for other attendees to participate in projects and discussions they care about. We also encourage attendees to highlight projects they plan to share before the event by adding them to our wiki.

We will wrap up each day with another short plenary session: the aim of this session is to summarize what was done, show brief demos and make improvements to the process.

To give you a sense of the venue, we attached a few pictures of the venue:

ARM Cambridge Arm Cambridge Panorama ARM Cambridge Atrium

How to Register?

As spaces at the Xen Project Hackathon are limited, we are asking attendees to request an invitation. You will need to cover your own travel, accommodation and other costs such as evening meals, etc. We do have a very limited number of travel stipends available for individuals who cannot afford to travel. Please contact community dot manager at xenproject dot org if you need to make use of it.

Reports from Previous Hackathons

More Information