Tag Archives: 2018

The Xen Project is participating in 2018 Summer round of Outreachy

This is a quick reminder that the Xen Project is again participating in Outreachy (May 2018 to August 2018 Round). Please check the Outreachy application page for more information.

Outreach Program for Women has been helping women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people get involved in free and open source software worldwide. Note that the program has been extended and is now also open to people from other groups underrepresented in FOSS: specifically the program is open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander. Information on Eligibility and the application process can be found here.

Meet us at FOSDEM 2018

As in the past, the Xen Project will have a booth at Europe’s biggest open source conference FOSDEM (taking place February 3rd and 4th in Brussels, Belgium).

Where?

During FOSDEM community volunteers will man our booth, which is located in bulding K (level 1, group C).

fosdem-event-2018

Meet the Team!

You will have the opportunity to speak to some of our developers: Anthony Perard (Maintainer of various components and qemu developer, Citrix), Daniel Kiper (Xen and Grub developer, Oracle) – Daniel will be mostly on the Grub booth, Ian Jackson (Committer and maintainer of various components, Citrix), Lars Kurth (Community Manager, Citrix), Roger Pau Monné (Maintainer of various components most recently PVH, Citrix), Simon Kainzer (Project Lead of Unikraft, NEC) and Wim ten Have (Xen and libvirt developer, Oracle). We also have Julien Fontanet (CTO, Vates) and Olivier Lambert (CEO, Vates) from Xen Orchestra at our booth!

We also have a few talks in the Virtualisation Devroom.

Customers Call the Shots — Verizon Cloud Adds Business Value with Quality of Service

dslutz

Both businesses and consumers rely on public clouds for a range of tasks and activities from collaboration and video streaming to gmail and Netflix. New companies are born with just a dozen employees, a laptop and an Internet connection practically overnight. This is all thanks to cloud computing.

It’s no surprise that in the next six years, almost 90 percent of new spending on Internet and communications technologies, a $5 trillion global business, will be on cloud-based technology, according to industry analyst firm IDC. Cloud applications will also account for 90 percent of total mobile data traffic by 2018, according to the Cisco Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update, 2013–2018.

The benefits for users are almost too numerous to count, but most IT professionals agree that cloud computing epitomizes constant change. Its ability to provide ubiquitous, on-demand access to a shared pool of networks, servers, storage, and services whenever and wherever they are needed is creating both market opportunity and market upheaval.

To temper the turbulence, capitalize on the opportunities and best prepare for any number of cloud unknowns, several of the world’s largest public providers including Amazon Web Services, Rackspace, IBM/SoftLayer and Verizon Terremark rely on Xen Project virtualization. Open source Xen Project software offers superior IT efficiencies, workload balancing, hyperscalability and tight security by running VMs on a cloud service.

While today the media is focusing on price wars and the possible commoditization of infrastructure as a service (IaaS), cloud providers like Verizon Terremark are innovating with novel Quality of Service agreements and new levels of automation. In his talk in Chicago at our Xen Project Developer Summit, Verizon Terremark’s Don Slutz will present an overview of the Verizon Cloud architecture based on Xen.

“It’s the core foundation of the Verizon Cloud, allowing our users to run any type or size workload they’d like to. Xen is critical to Verizon. Competing solutions were either too cost prohibitive or lacked the security controls that Xen has,” Don said.

Verizon Terremark is a long-time advocate of open standards and is more actively involved than ever before in the open source ecosystem. Verizon sponsors and participates in Xen Project software, invests in CloudStack and most recently joined the Cloud Foundry Foundation, hoping to see the cloud market mature quickly and provide businesses with cloud-based offerings that address specific needs like performance, choice, cost and flexibility.

For the past three years, Don has worked on integrating and designing Xen for the Verizon Cloud architecture along with seven full-time engineers. Today, clients are fully deployed on Verizon’s IaaS based on Xen. A focal point of his talk will be Verizon’s Quality of Service (QoS) goals with CPU, memory, network and disk performance.

“Often clouds end up requiring far too much support personnel, which we are trying to rectify. With our QoS agreement, we allow users to set the performance parameters their business requires and guarantee that Verizon will back these up at all times. Instead of focusing on speed or load size, we’ll guarantee certain CPU, memory, network or disk performance. This is really unique in the industry,” he added.

In addition to delivering workload efficiency, security and cost savings to its cloud customers, Verizon is also giving back to the Xen Project community.

“We’re working to make Verizon Cloud a high capacity service that allows people to move existing VMs easily onto it it,” Don said. “Our goal is to add enough VMWare support so that a guest can be exported from VMWare and automatically run without any changes on Xen.”

Verizon’s VMWare code is currently in review and in the past year has contributed 40 change sets that totals 4,300 lines of code.

Proof that demand for cloud services is growing and spurring more change, Don will also address Verizon’s design goals to move from three to seven data centers in the near future. If you’re interested in learning more, be sure to register today for the Xen Project Developer Summit to hear Don present on Tuesday, August 19 from 9 to 9:45 a.m.

About Don Slutz
Currently, Don works for Verizon Terremark enhancing Xen, which is the basis for Verizon Cloud. He got started early (1970) in computers because of his father Dr. Ralph J. Slutz and spent 16 years at Prime Computer in operating systems. He has extensive networking, performance, and testing experience.

Mirage OS v2.0: The new features

The first release of Mirage OS back in December 2013 introduced the prototype of the unikernel concept, which realised the promise of a safe, flexible mechanism to build highly optimized software stacks purpose-built for deployment in the public cloud (see the overview of Mirage OS for some background). Since then, we’ve been hard at work using and extending Mirage for real projects and the community has been steadily growing.

Today, we’re thrilled to announce the release of Mirage OS v2.0! Over the past few weeks the team has been hard at work writing about all the new features in this latest release, which I’ve been busy co-ordinating. Below are summaries of those features and links to in-depth blog posts where you can learn more:

Thomas Leonard's Cubieboard2

Thomas Leonard’s Cubieboard2

ARM device support: While the first version of Mirage was specialised towards conventional x86 clouds, the code generation and boot libraries have now been made portable enough to operate on low-power embedded ARM devices such as the Cubieboard 2. This is a key part of our efforts to build a safe, unified multiscale programming model for both cloud and mobile workloads as part of the Nymote project. We also upstreamed the changes required to the Xen Project so that other unikernel efforts like HalVM or ClickOS can benefit.

Irmin – distributed, branchable storage: Unikernels usually execute in a distributed, disconnection-prone environment (particularly with the new mobile ARM support). We therefore built the Irmin library to explicitly make synchronization easier via a Git-like persistence model that can be used to build and easily trace the operation of distributed applications across all of these diverse environments.

OCaml TLS: The philosophy of Mirage is to construct the entire operating system in a safe programming style, from the device drivers up. This continues in this release with a comprehensive OCaml implementation of Transport Layer Security, the most widely deployed end-to-end encryption protocol on the Internet (and one that is very prone to bad security holes). The series of posts is written by Hannes Mehnert and David Kaloper.

Modularity and communication: Mirage is built on the concept of a library operating system, and this release provides many new libraries to flexibly extend applications with new functionality.

  • Fitting the modular Mirage TCP/IP stack together” by Mindy Preston explains the rather unique modular architecture of our TCP/IP stack that lets you swap between the conventional Unix sockets API, or a complete implementation of TCP/IP in pure OCaml.
  • Vchan: low-latency inter-VM communication channels” by Jon Ludlam shows how unikernels can communicate efficiently with each other to form distributed clusters on a multicore Xen host, by establishing shared memory rings with each other.
  • Modular foreign function bindings” by Jeremy Yallop continues the march towards abstraction by expaining how to interface safely with code written in C, without having to write any unsafe C bindings! This forms the basis for allowing Xen unikernels to communicate with existing libraries that they may want to keep at arm’s length for security reasons.

All the libraries required for these new features are regularly released into the OPAM package manager, so just follow the installation instructions to give them a spin. A release this size probably introduces minor hiccups that may cause build failures, so we very much encourage bug reports on our issue tracker or questions to our mailing lists. Don’t be shy: no question is too basic, and we’d love to hear of any weird and wacky uses you put this new release to! And finally, the lifeblood of Mirage is about sharing and publishing libraries that add new functionality to the framework, so do get involved and open-source your own efforts.

Xen @ Linaro Connect Europe 2013

My name is Julien Grall.  I joined the Citrix Open Source team few months ago to work on Xen on ARM with Ian Campbell and Stefano Stabellini. Since Citrix has joined the Linaro Enterprise Group (LEG), I’m also part of the virtualization team which takes care of Xen, KVM and QEMU within Linaro.

A couple of weeks ago, I have attended my first Linaro Connect Europe, held in Dublin from 8th to 12th of July.  All the major players in the ARM world came together to discuss the future of the industry and build an healthy Open Source ecosystem for ARM.

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