Tag Archives: Automotive

A Recap of the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit: Community Health, Development Trends, Coding Changes and More

We were extremely thrilled to host our Xen Project Developer and Design Summit in Nanjing Jiangning, China this June. The event brought together our community and power users under one roof to collaborate and to learn more about the future of our project. It also gave us the opportunity to connect with a large group of our community who is based in China. We’ve seen a steady stream of Xen Project hypervisor adoption in this region.

If you were unable to attend the event, we have recordings of the presentations, and we also have the slideshares from the presentation available. Please check them out!

During our event, we always start with a weather report on the Xen Project. It covers areas that we are improving upon, where we need more support, and also the potential direction of the project. This blog covers information from the weather report as well as next steps and focus areas for the project.

Community Health
Code commits for the hypervisor have on average grown by 11% YoY since 2014. Commits in the first 5 months of 2018 have grown 11% compared to the same period last year. The top 6 contributors to the project since 2011 have been Citrix, Suse, AMD, Arm, Intel, Oracle. This is also true for the last 12 months in which 90% of contributions came from the top 6 players.

However, we have seen a larger than normal volume of contributions from Arm and AMD, which contributed twice as much as in previous years. In addition, EPAM is establishing itself on the top table with first contributions and a significant number of code reviews.  In addition, AWS started to make first significant code contributions in 2017.

Hardware security issues had an impact on the code review process of the project and thus on the project’s capability to take in some code. In other words, x86 related development that was not directly attributed to hardware security issues were slowed down, because developers normally reviewing contributions had less bandwidth to do so.

This has forced the community to make some changes that are starting to have a positive effect: x86 developers across companies are collaborating more and better, meaning that hardware security issues in 2018 had a smaller impact on the community than those in 2017.

Innovation and Development Trends
Unikraft, a Xen Project sub-project, is on a healthy growth projection. Unikraft aims to simplify the process of building unikernels through a unified and customizable code base. It was created after Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017.

The project recently upstreamed a significant amount of functionality, including:

  • Scheduling support, better/more complete support for KVM/Xen/Linux. Supporting Xen/KVM allows Unikraft to cater to a larger set of potential users/companies. Linux user-space provides an excellent development environment: Unikraft users can create their Unikraft unikernels as a Linux executable, use Linux’s wide range of debugging and performance optimization tools, and when done simply re-compile as a KVM or Xen unikernel (work on creating x86/Arm bare metal images is ongoing).
  • A release of newlib (a libc-like library) and lwip (a network stack: This support allows Unikraft to compile with most applications. It is a basic requirement to support a potentially wide range of applications.
  • The project is beginning to pick up traction with contributions coming from companies like NEC, Arm, and Oracle.

For more information check out the following two presentations: Unikraft and Unikraft on Arm.

We have been re-writing the x86 core. We are working on adding complex new CPU hardware features such as support for NVDIMMs and SGX. In addition, we are working on making technologies that have been used by security-conscious vendors in non-server environments ready to be used in server virtualization and cloud computing; support for measured boot is an example.

Another key innovation is a project called Panopticon, which aims to re-write some portions of the hypervisor to make Xen resilient to all types of side-channel attacks by removing unnecessary information about guests from the hypervisor.

You can find presentations related to these topics here (x86 evolution) and here (side-channel attacks and mitigations).

Continued Growth in Embedded and Automotive
We are seeing continued contributions within the embedded and automotive space to Xen Project Core with new features and functionality, including:

  • Co-processor (GPU) sharing framework enabling virtualization of co-processors such as FPGAs, DRMs, etc.
  • 2nd generation Power management and HPM on Arm  – this enables a huge reduction in power consumption, which is significant for some embedded market segments.
  • RTOS based Dom0 and code size reduction – this reduces the cost of safety certification significantly and is important for market segments where safety certification is important (such as automotive, avionics, medical, etc). We already managed to get Xen code size on Arm to below 45K SLOC and we expect that Dom0 will also be below 50K SLOC. This makes it possible to safety certify a Xen based stack to DAL C ASIL-B/C standards at a cost equivalent to less than 10 years.
  • Improved startup latency to boot multiple VMs in parallel from the device tree – this opens up the use of Xen to small IoT and embedded devices and allows booting of a complete Xen system in milliseconds compared to seconds. In addition, it halves the cost of safety certifications for systems where a Dom0 is not necessary

You can see the progress of our re-architecture in our latest release, Xen Project hypervisor 4.11. Also, the following summit presentations were relevant: here (Xen and automotive at Samsung) here (CPUFreq) and here (Real-time support).

These are just a few features and updates that make it easier for Xen to be used in embedded environments and market segments where safety certification is relevant. In addition, this will also significantly improve BoM and security in other market segments. On x86 we are also reducing code size, but this is significantly harder because of backward compatibility guarantees for x86 hardware and older operating systems.

Conclusion
The event was a great success with a lot of community and technical topics, like “How to Get Your Code Into Xen” and “The Art of Virtualizing Cache Maintenance.” Find the playlist for the full conference here. Additionally, our design sessions focused on architecture, embedded and safety, security, performance, and working practices and processes. You can find what was discussed, and next steps with these areas on our wiki.

If you want to stay abreast of where and when the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit will be held next year, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Join us at Root Linux Conference Happening in Kyiv, Ukraine This April!

Root Linux Conference is coming to Kyiv, Ukraine on April 14th. The conference is the biggest Linux and embedded conference in Eastern Europe with presenters exploring topics like: Linux in mobile devices, wearables, medical equipment, vehicles, and more. Want to learn about the next generation of embedded solutions? This is the conference for you.

Juergen Gross, Linux Kernel developer at SUSE, and Paul Durrant, Senior Principal Software Engineer at Citrix Systems, are keynoting the conference. Juergen will cover Xen paravirtualized (PV) devices and Paul will cover Intel GVT-g integration into XenServer.

Early bird priced tickets for the event are still available here.

See you there!

Call for Proposals Open for the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit Happening in June!

Registration and the call for proposals are open for the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2018, which will be held in Nanjing Jiangning, China from June 20 – 22, 2018. The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit combines the formats of Xen Project Developer Summits with Xen Project Hackathons, and brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users.

Submit a Talk

Do you have an interesting use case around Xen Project technology or best practices around the community? There’s a wide variety of topics we are looking for, including cloud, server virtualization, unikernels, automotive, security, embedded environments, network function virtualization (NFV), and more. You can find all the suggested topics for presentations and panels here (make sure you select the Topics tab).

Several formats are being accepted for speaking proposals, including:

  • Presentations and panels
  • Interactive design and problem solving sessions. These sessions can be submitted as part of the CFP, but we will reserve a number of design sessions to be allocated during the event.
    • Proposers of design sessions are expected to host and moderate design sessions following the format we have used at Xen Project Hackathons. If you have not participated in these in the past, check out past event reports from 2016, 2015 and 2013.

Never talked at a conference before? Don’t worry! We encourage new speakers to submit for our events!

Here are some dates to remember for submissions and in general:

  • CFP Close: April 13, 2018
  • CFP Notifications: April 30 – May 2, 2018
  • Schedule Announced: May 3, 2018
  • Event: June 20 – 22, 2018

Registration

Come join us for this event, and if you register by May 2, you’ll get an early bird discount of $125/ 800 Yuan Travel stipends are available for students or individuals that are not associated with a company. If you have any questions, please send a note to community.manager@xenproject.org.

Curious about last year’s event? Check out a few of our presentations last year here!

Automotive, Security and the Future of the Xen Project at The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit

The Xen Developer and Design Summit schedule is now live! This conference combines the formats of the Xen Project Developer Summits with the Xen Project Hackathons. If you are part of the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users, come join us in Budapest, Hungary, July 11 – 13 for this must-attend event!

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The conference will cover many different topic areas including community, embedded/automotive, performance, tooling, hardware, security and more. The format will include traditional panels and presentation, as well as design and problem solving sessions.

Design and problem solving session proposals will be accepted until July 7. This is a great way to meet other developers face-to-face to:

  • Discuss and advance the design and architecture of future functionality
  • Coordinate and plan upcoming features
  • Discuss and share best practices and ideas on how to improve community collaboration
  • Hear interactive sessions covering lessons learned from contributors, users and vendor

Submit your design and problem solving ideas here.

Keynotes this year are coming from Lars Kurth, Xen Project Chairperson and Director of Open Source Solutions at Citrix; Oleksandr Andrushchenko, Lead Software Engineer at EPAM Systems; Stefano Stabellini, Virtualization Architect at Aporeto; and Wei Liu, Senior Software Engineer at Citrix.

Here’s a small sampling of other speaking sessions during the conference:

Automotive

  • Dedicated Secure Domain as an Approach for Certification of Automotive Sector Solutions from Iurii Mykhalskyi of GlobalLogic
  • Harmony of CPU Scheduling Between RT Guest OS and Rich Guest OS in Automotive Virtualization from Sangyun Lee of LG Electronics

Security

  • Hypervisor-Based Security: Bringing Virtualized Exceptions Into the Game from Mihai Dontu of Bitdefender
  • Uniprof: Transparent Unikernel Performance Profiling and Debugging from Florian Schmidt of NEC

Future of Xen

  • Intel GVT-g: From Production to Upstream from Zhi Wang of Intel
  • Recent and Ongoing Xen Related Work in the Linux Kernel from Jürgen Groß of SUSE

General Hypervisor

  • Bring up PCI Passthrough on ARM from Julien Grall of ARM
  • EFI Secure Boot, Shim and Xen: Current Status of Developments from Daniel Kiper of Oracle

You can view the entire schedule here. Early bird specials for tickets (price is $250) are available until May 31st.

A special thank you to our Diamond Sponsor Citrix and Gold sponsors ARM, Intel and Superfluidity. We look forward to seeing you at the event in July, and please stay informed on Xen Project updates by following us on social (Twitter and Facebook) and registering to our xen-announce mailing list.

 

Q&A with GlobalLogic on the Xen Project and Automotive Virtualization

The Xen Project is commonly used in embedded scenarios due to its security features, light-weight architecture and open source community. These core attributes are now making it more pervasive in the automotive industry, which has similar demands to the embedded industry, especially when it comes to security requirements.

To better understand how the Xen Project is used in the automotive space, we sat down with the folks at GlobalLogic to discuss updates on its Nautilus platform, which uses the Xen Project hypervisor; why they originally chose Xen; how hypervisors generally work in the automotive space; and the company’s upcoming plans with automotive virtualization.

Last year when we talked to GlobalLogic, you mentioned that GPU Virtualization was the next phase of automotive innovation. Where are you at in terms of implementing GPU Virtualization?

We have successfully implemented our Nautilus platform’s GPU virtualization feature for several Tier 1 automotive vendors (located in Japan, the US, and Europe). This was a big win for us and we learned a lot along the way and experienced some major benefits. Mainly, GPU virtualization has eliminated almost all performance degradation during the rendering of heavy 3D graphics scenes, allowing us to create a new level of IVI systems.

Why is the hypervisor important for automotive virtualization and GPU Virtualization in general? Why is Xen Project the hypervisor of choice for you within this space?

The hypervisor allows a significant decrease to the cost of automotive production and reduces the cost of BOM because the functions that were previously executed on different CPUs can be run on separate VMs. At the same time, GPU virtualization is beneficial in the process of 2D/3D graphics rendering. Therefore, the use of hypervisor enables building systems that perform better than their more expensive completely-hardware analogues.

Moreover, there are less processors per board, which leads to higher fail-safety. Essentially, a virtual system divided into a number of small subsystems is cheaper to maintain.

At the dawn of our project, GlobalLogic engineers considered various hypervisors, and finally decided that Xen Project was the most suitable solution because it is open source and has a rich history of application in various fields. Using the Xen Project, lets us concentrate on specific vehicle-related challenges instead of reinventing a virtualization solution.

What are the top three benefits you get from using the Xen hypervisor?

The first benefit that we have experienced is the decreased time to market for the manufacturers. Secondly, our customers get demos for free – if we used a proprietary product, we couldn’t afford this. Finally, it is great to experience the constant support of the global community and the community-driven approach to vulnerability detecting and fixing that we get with the Xen Project.

Were there any challenges with implementing Xen? How did you overcome these challenges?

The main challenges that we had with Xen and GPU virtualization was related to the different based ARM platforms. To overcome this, we developed a bench of drivers and extended the environment around them.

What are the next stages of growth for with automotive virtualization? Any trends that we should watch out for?

GlobalLogic is actively working on the commercialization of the Nautilus platform. We are expanding the GPU feature to a network of customers and vehicle models. At the same time, we are expanding the functionality of virtualization in areas like self-driving, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), connected services, safety, etc.

CES 2015: Smart Cars are the New Smart Phone

This is a reprint of the following Linux.com article by Alex Agizim, VP, CTO Embedded Systems at GlobalLogic

“Smart car” technology had a huge presence at CES 2015, from BMW’s 360-degree collision avoidance and parking assist features to Audi’s Human Machine Interface (HMI) that connects to an iPhone or Android device. And with both Apple and Google jumping into the market with their CarPlay and Android Auto IVI systems, the automotive industry is on the brink of some significant changes.

For example, thanks to new developments in open source virtualization, OEMs and car manufacturers are closer than ever to achieving a secure, flexible, robust, and customizable integrated cockpit — one that keeps drivers safe while meeting consumers’ connected car expectations. Already well-known for providing security, stability, and isolation in the datacenter, automotive virtualization is gaining wider attention due to additional hardening and new support for ARM.

While this is certainly exciting, virtualization remains a roadblock to some in the smart car industry. I personally had the opportunity to demonstrate GlobalLogic’s Nautilus platform for automotive virtualization at GENIVI’s CES demo and networking event. Leveraging a TI J6 SoC, I demo’d a dual-screen virtual cockpit with one screen emulating a Linux-powered driver information display, and the other screen emulating an Android-powered IVI system. The entire configuration ran on Xen Project Hypervisor 4.5 with three domains: Dom0 (thin control), DomU (Linux), and DomU (Android).

During the demo, I showcased how Nautilus achieves an overall system boot time of 8 seconds, an early RVC of 1.5 seconds, and secure and reliable peripheral sharing (including GPUs). Most importantly, I demonstrated how even if the Android virtual machine crashes, it has absolutely no influence on the mission-critical Linux virtual machine. With Nautilus automotive software, developers can host a number of VMs that are completely sandboxed from each other, thereby ensuring that all vehicle services will continue to operate even if one specific component fails.


The demo was well-received by GENIVI’s attendees, and I got the impression that many Tier 1 OEMs were thinking about using virtualization in their next-gen platforms. This is a huge milestone because, up until very recently, virtualization had a bad rep in the automotive industry. Previous attempts at virtualization using ARM A9 architecture ultimately failed because there was no hardware support for it. Many were also highly reluctant to use open source technology because it lacked proper compliance to strict auto industry regulations. But with platforms like Nautilus, developers can leverage cutting-edge open source technology that is ISO 26262 certification ready to create secure and reliable automotive virtualization experiences.

In fact, GlobalLogic’s goal is to make Nautilus part of the reference Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) software, an open source project that is developing a common, Linux-based software stack for the connected car. We are also a founding leader for Xen Project’s Embedded and Automotive initiative. GlobalLogic is working to add the Xen-based technology to the AGL spec and is further developing the platform’s real-time scheduling and peripheral sharing features to improve the use of a single physical CPU for multiple guest OSes and peripheral devices. We’ll soon be extending QNX and Tizen IVI 3.0 support to improve the functionality of other features. Finally, we are also expanding Nautilus to support even more SoCs in the next six months, such as Renesas R-Car H2/M2, which offers hardware support for virtualization.

Based on my work with the Nautilus platform and my observations of the general automotive industry, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the first PoCs for automotive virtualization coming out of China and Japan later this year. The momentum behind smart car technology development is very strong right now, and I’m excited to see what happens when automotive OEMs finally start taking advantage of virtualization’s many possibilities.