Tag Archives: Community

Introducing the Xen Project Code Review Dashboard

The Xen Project’s code contributions have grown more than 10% each year. Although growth is extremely healthy to the project as a whole, it has its growing pains. For the Xen Project, it led to issues with its code review process: maintainers believed that their review workload increased and a number of vendors claimed that it took significantly longer for contributions to be upstreamed, compared to the past.

The project developed some basic scripts that correlated development list traffic with git commits, which showed indeed that it took longer for patches to be committed. In order to identify possible root causes, the project initially ran a number of surveys to identify possible causes for the slow down. Unfortunately, many of the observations made by community members contradicted each other, and were thus not actionable. To solve this problem, the Xen Project worked with Bitergia, a company that focuses on analyzing community software development processes, to better understand and address the issues at hand. We worked with Bitergia on an initial statistical analysis of the code review process and later on a Code Review Dashboard for use by the community. The following OSCON presentation lays out the journey, the project went through:

Findings of the Initial Code Review Study

There were three key areas that we found that were causing the slow down:

  • Huge growth in comment activity from 2013 to 2015
  • We also saw that the time it took to merge patches (=time to merge) increased significantly from 2012 to the first half of 2014. However, from the second half of 2014 time to merge moved back to its long term average. This was a strong indicator that the pre-emptive measures we took, such as a focus on design and architecture reviews and contributor training, actually had an effect.
  • Looking at this in more detail, it turned out that complex patches were taking significantly longer to merge than small patches. As it turns out, a significant number of new features were actually rather complex. At the same time, the demands on the project to deliver better quality and security had also raised the bar for what could be accepted, which impacted new contributors more than established ones.

Introducing the Xen Project Code Review Dashboard

To make the tooling that we developed more accessible to the entire community, the Xen Project Advisory Board funded the development of a Code Review Dashboard. We defined a set of use-cases and supporting data that broadly covered three areas:

  • Community use cases to encourage desired behaviour: this would be metrics such as real review contributions (not justed ACKed-by and Reviewed-by flags), comparing review activity against contributions.
  • Performance use cases that would allow us to spot issues early: these would allow us to filter time related metrics by a number of different criteria such as complexity of a patch series.
  • Backlog use cases to optimize process and focus. The intention here was to give contributors and maintainers tools to see what reviews are active, nearly complete, complete or stale.

To find out more check out

Value for other projects

Like many FOSS projects, the Xen Project code review process uses a mailing list-based review process, and this could be a good blueprint for projects that are finding themselves in the same predicament. It is already clear, that there are many useful additions that can in future be added to the technology we have developed. In addition, we are currently working on improvements of the Code Review Dashboard as part of an Outreachy Project by Priya V (check out her blog), which is jointly mentored by Lars Kurth (Xen Project) and Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona (Bitergia). All the code is open source: if you want to have a look, check out the code and the contribution guide.

Xen Project Hackathon 16 : Event Report

We just wrapped another successful Xen Project Hackathon, which is an annual event, hosted by Xen Project member companies, typically at their corporate offices. This year’s event was hosted by ARM at their Cambridge HQ. 42 delegates descended on Cambridge from Aporeto, ARM, Assured Information Security, Automotive Electrical Systems, BAE Systems, Bromium, Citrix, GlobalLogic, OnApp, Onets, Oracle, StarLab, SUSE and Vates to attend. A big thank you (!) to ARM and in particular to Thomas Molgaard for organising the event and the social activities afterwards.

Here are a few images that helped capture the event:

Taking a breather and photo opp outside of ARM headquarters in Cambridge

Taking a breather and photo opp outside of ARM headquarters in Cambridge

Working on solving the mysteries of the world.

Working on solving the mysteries of the world

Continuing to work hard on solving the mysteries of the world

Continuing to work hard on solving the mysteries of the world

Xen Project Hackathons have evolved in format into a series of structured problem solving sessions that scale up to 50 people. We combine this with a more traditional hackathon approach where programmers (and others involved in software development) collaborate intensively on software projects.

This year’s event was particularly productive because all our core developers and the project’s leadership were present. We focused on a lot of topics, but two of our main themes this year evolved around security and community development. We’ll cover these topics in more detail and how they fit within our next release 4.7 and development going forward, but below is a little taste of some of the other themes of this year’s Hackathon sessions:

  • Security improvements: A trimmed down QEMU to reduce attack surface, de-privileging QEMU and the x86 emulator to reduce the impact of security vulnerabilities in those components, XSplice, KConfig support which allows to remove parts of Xen at compile time, run-time disablement of Xen features to reduce the attack surface, vulnerabilities, disaggregation and enabling XSM (Xen’s equivalent of the Linux Security Modules which are also known as SELinux) by default.
  • Security features: We had two sessions on the future of XSplice (first version to be released in Xen 4.7), which allows users of Xen to apply security fixes on a running Xen instance (aka no need to reboot).
  • Robustness: A session on restartable Dom0 and driver domains, which again will significantly reduce the overhead of applying security patches.
  • Community and code review: A couple of sessions on optimising our working practices: most notably some clarifications to the maintainer role and how we can make code reviews more efficient.
  • Virtualization Modes: The next stage of PVH, which combines the best of HVM and PV. We also had discussions around some functionality that is currently developed in Linux on which PVH has dependencies.
  • Making Development more Scalable: A number of sessions to improve the toolstack and libxl. We covered topics such as making storage support pluggable via a plug-in architecture, making it easier to develop new PV drivers to support automotive and embedded vendors, and improvements to our build system, testing, stub domains and xenstored.
  • ARM support: There were a number of planning sessions for Xen ARM support. We covered the future roadmap, how to implement PCI passthrough, and how we can improve testing for the increasing range of ARM HW with support for virtualization, also applicable outside the server space.

There were many more sessions covering performance, scalability and other topics. The session’s host(s) post meeting notes on xen-devel@ (search for Hackathon in the subject line), if you want to explore any topic in more detail. To make it easier for people who do not follow our development lists, we also posted links to Hackathon related xen-devel@ discussions on our wiki.

Besides providing an opportunity to meet face-to-face, build bridges and solve problems, we always make sure that we have social events. After all Hackathons should be fun and bring people together. This year we had a dinner in Cambridge and of course the obligatory punting trip, which is part of every Cambridge trip.

Embarking on the punting journey

Embarking on the punting journey

Continued exploration of discovering the mysteries of the universe, while on a boat

Continued exploration of discovering the mysteries of the universe, while on a boat

Again, a big thanks to ARM for hosting the event! Also, a reminder that we’ll be hosting our Xen Project Developer Summit next August in Toronto, Canada. This event will happen directly after LinuxCon North America and is a great opportunity to learn more about Xen Project development and what’s happening within the Linux Foundation ecosystem at large. CFPs are still open until May 6th!

Ian Pratt at NSDI ’08

Ian Pratt gave the Keynote address at the USENIX NSDI 2008 event last week. Here is a link to the USENIX NSDI site: http://www.usenix.org/events/nsdi08/tech/tech.html. Ian’s slides are available in pdf (ian-nsdi-keynote-apr2008.pdf). I don’t know if a video was taken of the presentation but will watch the USENIX site just in case.