Tag Archives: Hackathon

Now Accepting Submissions for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017

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We’re excited to announce that registration and the call for proposals is open for Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017, which will be held in Budapest, Hungary from July 11-13, 2017. The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit combines the formats of Xen Project Developer Summits with Xen Project Hackathons, and brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users.

Submit a Talk

Do you have an interesting use case around Xen Project technology or best practices around the community? There’s a wide variety of topics we are looking for, including security, embedded environments, network function virtualization (NFV), and more. You can find all the suggested topics for presentations and panels here (make sure you select the Topics tab).

Several formats are being accepted for speaking proposals, including:

  • Presentations and Panels
  • Interactive design and problem solving sessions. These sessions can be submitted as part of the CFP, but we will reserve a number of design sessions to be allocated during the event. Proposers of design sessions are expected to host and moderate design sessions following the format we have used at Xen Project Hackathons. If you have not participated in these in the past, check out past event reports from 2016, 2015 and 2013.

Never talked at a conference before? Don’t worry! We encourage new speakers to submit for our events and have plenty of resources to help you prepare for your presentation.

Here are some dates to remember for submissions and in general:

  • CFP Close: April 14, 2017
  • CFP Notifications: May 5, 2017
  • Schedule Announced: May 16, 2017
  • Event: July 11-13, 2017

Registration

Come join us for this event, and if you register by May 19, you’ll get an early bird discount :) Travel stipends are available for students or individuals that are not associated with a company. If you have any questions, please send a note to community.manager@xenproject.org.

Xen Project Hackathon 16 : Event Report

We just wrapped another successful Xen Project Hackathon, which is an annual event, hosted by Xen Project member companies, typically at their corporate offices. This year’s event was hosted by ARM at their Cambridge HQ. 42 delegates descended on Cambridge from Aporeto, ARM, Assured Information Security, Automotive Electrical Systems, BAE Systems, Bromium, Citrix, GlobalLogic, OnApp, Onets, Oracle, StarLab, SUSE and Vates to attend. A big thank you (!) to ARM and in particular to Thomas Molgaard for organising the event and the social activities afterwards.

Here are a few images that helped capture the event:

Taking a breather and photo opp outside of ARM headquarters in Cambridge

Taking a breather and photo opp outside of ARM headquarters in Cambridge

Working on solving the mysteries of the world.

Working on solving the mysteries of the world

Continuing to work hard on solving the mysteries of the world

Continuing to work hard on solving the mysteries of the world

Xen Project Hackathons have evolved in format into a series of structured problem solving sessions that scale up to 50 people. We combine this with a more traditional hackathon approach where programmers (and others involved in software development) collaborate intensively on software projects.

This year’s event was particularly productive because all our core developers and the project’s leadership were present. We focused on a lot of topics, but two of our main themes this year evolved around security and community development. We’ll cover these topics in more detail and how they fit within our next release 4.7 and development going forward, but below is a little taste of some of the other themes of this year’s Hackathon sessions:

  • Security improvements: A trimmed down QEMU to reduce attack surface, de-privileging QEMU and the x86 emulator to reduce the impact of security vulnerabilities in those components, XSplice, KConfig support which allows to remove parts of Xen at compile time, run-time disablement of Xen features to reduce the attack surface, vulnerabilities, disaggregation and enabling XSM (Xen’s equivalent of the Linux Security Modules which are also known as SELinux) by default.
  • Security features: We had two sessions on the future of XSplice (first version to be released in Xen 4.7), which allows users of Xen to apply security fixes on a running Xen instance (aka no need to reboot).
  • Robustness: A session on restartable Dom0 and driver domains, which again will significantly reduce the overhead of applying security patches.
  • Community and code review: A couple of sessions on optimising our working practices: most notably some clarifications to the maintainer role and how we can make code reviews more efficient.
  • Virtualization Modes: The next stage of PVH, which combines the best of HVM and PV. We also had discussions around some functionality that is currently developed in Linux on which PVH has dependencies.
  • Making Development more Scalable: A number of sessions to improve the toolstack and libxl. We covered topics such as making storage support pluggable via a plug-in architecture, making it easier to develop new PV drivers to support automotive and embedded vendors, and improvements to our build system, testing, stub domains and xenstored.
  • ARM support: There were a number of planning sessions for Xen ARM support. We covered the future roadmap, how to implement PCI passthrough, and how we can improve testing for the increasing range of ARM HW with support for virtualization, also applicable outside the server space.

There were many more sessions covering performance, scalability and other topics. The session’s host(s) post meeting notes on xen-devel@ (search for Hackathon in the subject line), if you want to explore any topic in more detail. To make it easier for people who do not follow our development lists, we also posted links to Hackathon related xen-devel@ discussions on our wiki.

Besides providing an opportunity to meet face-to-face, build bridges and solve problems, we always make sure that we have social events. After all Hackathons should be fun and bring people together. This year we had a dinner in Cambridge and of course the obligatory punting trip, which is part of every Cambridge trip.

Embarking on the punting journey

Embarking on the punting journey

Continued exploration of discovering the mysteries of the universe, while on a boat

Continued exploration of discovering the mysteries of the universe, while on a boat

Again, a big thanks to ARM for hosting the event! Also, a reminder that we’ll be hosting our Xen Project Developer Summit next August in Toronto, Canada. This event will happen directly after LinuxCon North America and is a great opportunity to learn more about Xen Project development and what’s happening within the Linux Foundation ecosystem at large. CFPs are still open until May 6th!

ARM hosts Xen Project Hackathon, April 18-19 in Cambridge, UK

I am pleased to announce the next Xen Project Hackathon. The Hackathon will be hosted by ARM in their Cambridge Headquarters from April 18 and 19. I wanted to thank Philippe Robin and Thomas Molgaard from ARM for hosting the Hackathon.

ARMARM designs technology that is at the heart of advanced digital products and has built a broad partner community that increasingly embraces an open source and collaborative development model to keep pace with transitions in the industry. Enabling developer collaboration on open source projects, like Xen, is key to help optimize support for system virtualization. ARM is pleased to host and support this event.

What to expect at a Xen Project Hackathon?

The aim of the Hackathon is to give developers the opportunity to meet face to face, to discuss development, coordinate, write code, and collaborate with other developers. And, of course, the event will allow everyone to meet in person and build relationships. To facilitate this, we will have a social event on the evening of the 18th. We will cover many hot topics such as the latest Xen Project Hypervisor 4.7 features, planning for the next Xen Project Hypervisor release, Cloud Integration, Cloud Operating Systems, Mirage OS as well as Xen Project in emerging segments such as embedded, mobile, automotive and NFV. But, at the end of the day, the community will chose the topics that are covered — more on our process here below.

To ensure that the event runs efficiently, we adhere to the following process: Each day is divided into several segments. We will have a number of work areas that are labelled with numbers (or other unique identifiers). Each morning starts with a plenary and scheduling session. Every attendee who cares about a topic can announce a topic, which we will map against a work area and time-slot. This makes it easy for other attendees to participate in projects and discussions they care about. We also encourage attendees to highlight projects they plan to share before the event by adding them to our wiki.

We will wrap up each day with another short plenary session: the aim of this session is to summarize what was done, show brief demos and make improvements to the process.

To give you a sense of the venue, we attached a few pictures of the venue:

ARM Cambridge Arm Cambridge Panorama ARM Cambridge Atrium

How to Register?

As spaces at the Xen Project Hackathon are limited, we are asking attendees to request an invitation. You will need to cover your own travel, accommodation and other costs such as evening meals, etc. We do have a very limited number of travel stipends available for individuals who cannot afford to travel. Please contact community dot manager at xenproject dot org if you need to make use of it.

Reports from Previous Hackathons

More Information

Intel hosts Xen Project Hackathon, April 28-29 in Shanghai

I am pleased to announce the next Xen Project Hackathon to be held this spring.  Although we call it a Hackathon, the event consists of several parallel sessions in which Xen Project developers will create, discuss and review designs and changes that impact Xen’s architecture. We’ll perform code reviews, discuss our future roadmap, work on improving the development process, tackle debug problems in the code base and cover other development related topics. Sessions are very interactive: typically there are no presentations.

Intel-logoThe Hackathon will be hosted by Intel at their Shanghai Zizhu Campus, April 28-29. I wanted to thank Susie Li and Mei Yu from Intel for hosting the Hackathon. Intel has been one of the core contributors to the Xen Project since 2003 and has been contributing many features to the Project. Intel joined the Xen Project Advisory Board in 2013 when the software became a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project. We recently interviewed Donald Dugger, Intel’s Virtualization Architect, to find out why Intel continues to support, contribute and invest in the Xen Project.

What to expect at a Xen Project Hackathon?

The aim of the Hackathon is to give developers the opportunity to meet face-to-face to discuss development, coordinate, write code and collaborate with other developers. Of course, the event will allow everyone to meet in-person and build relationships; to facilitate this, we will have a social event on the evening of the 28th. We will cover many hot topics such as the latest Xen Project Hypervisor 4.6 features, planning for the next Xen Project Hypervisor release, Cloud Integration, Cloud Operating Systems, MirageOS, as well as new opportunities in embedded, mobile, automotive and NFV. But at the end of the day, the community chooses what topics will be covered.

To ensure that the event runs efficiently, each day is divided into several segments. We will have a number of work areas that are labelled with numbers (or other unique identifiers). Each morning will start with a plenary and scheduling session. Every attendee can propose a session, which we will map against a work area and time-slot. This makes it easy for other attendees to participate in projects and sessions they care about. Of course we also encourage attendees to highlight projects they plan to share before the event by adding them to our wiki.

How to Register

Spaces for the Xen Project Hackathon are limited (we can accommodate 50 people). Be sure to request an invitation to the event before our cut-off registration date of April 12th, 2015.

More Information

Xen Tutorial (Free Slides)

Were you unable to make it to any of the Xen training sessions so far?  You could attend one of the next Xen training sessions; however, if you are also unable to attend the upcoming sessions, you are still in luck.

The instructors of the recent Xen training sessions, featured at several conferences around the United States, have posted their slides online for the benefit of the Xen community.  These slides, both viewable and downloadable online, are being provided free for use, sharing, and adaptation by you or your organization, and are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License.

The slides may be freely viewed and downloaded here:

The most recent version of these slides were authored by Zach Shepherd and Wenjin Hu, derived from the original slides by Todd Deshane and Patrick F. Wilbur.  They largely reference the Running Xen: A Hands-On Guide to the Art of Virtualization book, so you might also want to check that out if you prefer a book format for learning about the Xen open-source hypervisor.

(These slides are being hosted by the Clarkson Open Source Institute, where they supersede the now famous 2005 “Installing Xen” how-to that was originally located at the above URL.)