Tag Archives: hypervisor

Get an Introduction to Working with the Xen Project Hypervisor and More at Open Source Summit #OSSummit

Open Source Summit is the premier event to get introduced to open source and to learn more about the trends that are surrounding this space. This year’s Open Source Summit will be held in Vancouver, BC from August 29 – 31. The event covers a wide range of topics from blockchain to security to virtualization to containers and much more.

We are very excited to have a few members of the Xen Project attending the conference and are extremely excited to host a workshop to help folks learn more about using Xen and its related technologies. If you are looking to go or are attending, below is where we will be. Come by, and say “hi.”

Xen: The Way of the Panda
Lars Kurth, the chairperson of the Xen Project, is hosting a workshop that will guide you through getting started with the Xen Project Hypervisor. Usually, you will use Xen indirectly as part of a commercial product, a distro, a hosting or cloud service and only indirectly use Xen. By following this session you will learn how Xen and virtualization work under the hood. The workshop will cover:

  • The Xen architecture and architecture concepts related to virtualization in general;
  • Storage and Networking in Xen;
  • More practically you will learn how to install Xen, create guests and work with them;
  • A detailed look at virtualization modes, boot process and troubleshooting Xen setups;
  • Memory management (ballooning), virtual CPUs, scheduling, pinning, saving/restoring and migrating VMs;
  • If time permits, we will cover some more advanced topics.

Seating is limited for this session. If you would like to attend, be sure to register asap. The workshop is happening on Wednesday, August 29 from 2:10 – 3:40 pm. Please also follow the preparation guide that is attached to the talk: you will need to download some software packages on your laptop prior to the session to avoid issues with internet bandwidth.

Disclosure Policies in the World of the Cloud: A Look Behind the Scenes

The tech world does not exist in silos and one security vulnerability can impact an entire ecosystem (case in point Meltdown and Spectre). How do open source projects and companies alike ensure that their security disclosure policies are up to standards, especially in the world of cloud computing?

This session, also led by Lars, will introduce different patterns for managing the disclosure of security vulnerabilities in use today and explore their trade-offs and limitations. Come to listen in on the conversation on Wednesday, August 29 from 12:00 – 12:40 pm.

A New Open Source Technology to Secure Containers for IoT

Containers are extremely convenient to package applications and deploy them quickly across the data center. They enable microservices oriented approaches to the development of complex apps. These technologies are benefiting the data center, but are struggling to find their place at the edge.

Embedded developers need the convenience of containers for deployment while retaining real-time capabilities and supporting mixing and matching of applications with different safety and criticality profiles on the same SoC.

A long-time contributor to the Xen Project, Stefano Stabellini, will be presenting on how ViryaOS is aiming to bring the power of containers to the embedded developer. Stefano will be talking through the proof of concept for this new technology on Wednesday, August 29 from 5:40 – 6:20 pm.

We look forward to seeing you at OSS! If you want to connect with us at the conference, please be sure to reach out to Stefano (@stabellinist) or Lars (@lars_kurth) via Twitter. You can also drop us a line in the comments section.

 

A Recap of the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit: Community Health, Development Trends, Coding Changes and More

We were extremely thrilled to host our Xen Project Developer and Design Summit in Nanjing Jiangning, China this June. The event brought together our community and power users under one roof to collaborate and to learn more about the future of our project. It also gave us the opportunity to connect with a large group of our community who is based in China. We’ve seen a steady stream of Xen Project hypervisor adoption in this region.

If you were unable to attend the event, we have recordings of the presentations, and we also have the slideshares from the presentation available. Please check them out!

During our event, we always start with a weather report on the Xen Project. It covers areas that we are improving upon, where we need more support, and also the potential direction of the project. This blog covers information from the weather report as well as next steps and focus areas for the project.

Community Health
Code commits for the hypervisor have on average grown by 11% YoY since 2014. Commits in the first 5 months of 2018 have grown 11% compared to the same period last year. The top 6 contributors to the project since 2011 have been Citrix, Suse, AMD, Arm, Intel, Oracle. This is also true for the last 12 months in which 90% of contributions came from the top 6 players.

However, we have seen a larger than normal volume of contributions from Arm and AMD, which contributed twice as much as in previous years. In addition, EPAM is establishing itself on the top table with first contributions and a significant number of code reviews.  In addition, AWS started to make first significant code contributions in 2017.

Hardware security issues had an impact on the code review process of the project and thus on the project’s capability to take in some code. In other words, x86 related development that was not directly attributed to hardware security issues were slowed down, because developers normally reviewing contributions had less bandwidth to do so.

This has forced the community to make some changes that are starting to have a positive effect: x86 developers across companies are collaborating more and better, meaning that hardware security issues in 2018 had a smaller impact on the community than those in 2017.

Innovation and Development Trends
Unikraft, a Xen Project sub-project, is on a healthy growth projection. Unikraft aims to simplify the process of building unikernels through a unified and customizable code base. It was created after Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2017.

The project recently upstreamed a significant amount of functionality, including:

  • Scheduling support, better/more complete support for KVM/Xen/Linux. Supporting Xen/KVM allows Unikraft to cater to a larger set of potential users/companies. Linux user-space provides an excellent development environment: Unikraft users can create their Unikraft unikernels as a Linux executable, use Linux’s wide range of debugging and performance optimization tools, and when done simply re-compile as a KVM or Xen unikernel (work on creating x86/Arm bare metal images is ongoing).
  • A release of newlib (a libc-like library) and lwip (a network stack: This support allows Unikraft to compile with most applications. It is a basic requirement to support a potentially wide range of applications.
  • The project is beginning to pick up traction with contributions coming from companies like NEC, Arm, and Oracle.

For more information check out the following two presentations: Unikraft and Unikraft on Arm.

We have been re-writing the x86 core. We are working on adding complex new CPU hardware features such as support for NVDIMMs and SGX. In addition, we are working on making technologies that have been used by security-conscious vendors in non-server environments ready to be used in server virtualization and cloud computing; support for measured boot is an example.

Another key innovation is a project called Panopticon, which aims to re-write some portions of the hypervisor to make Xen resilient to all types of side-channel attacks by removing unnecessary information about guests from the hypervisor.

You can find presentations related to these topics here (x86 evolution) and here (side-channel attacks and mitigations).

Continued Growth in Embedded and Automotive
We are seeing continued contributions within the embedded and automotive space to Xen Project Core with new features and functionality, including:

  • Co-processor (GPU) sharing framework enabling virtualization of co-processors such as FPGAs, DRMs, etc.
  • 2nd generation Power management and HPM on Arm  – this enables a huge reduction in power consumption, which is significant for some embedded market segments.
  • RTOS based Dom0 and code size reduction – this reduces the cost of safety certification significantly and is important for market segments where safety certification is important (such as automotive, avionics, medical, etc). We already managed to get Xen code size on Arm to below 45K SLOC and we expect that Dom0 will also be below 50K SLOC. This makes it possible to safety certify a Xen based stack to DAL C ASIL-B/C standards at a cost equivalent to less than 10 years.
  • Improved startup latency to boot multiple VMs in parallel from the device tree – this opens up the use of Xen to small IoT and embedded devices and allows booting of a complete Xen system in milliseconds compared to seconds. In addition, it halves the cost of safety certifications for systems where a Dom0 is not necessary

You can see the progress of our re-architecture in our latest release, Xen Project hypervisor 4.11. Also, the following summit presentations were relevant: here (Xen and automotive at Samsung) here (CPUFreq) and here (Real-time support).

These are just a few features and updates that make it easier for Xen to be used in embedded environments and market segments where safety certification is relevant. In addition, this will also significantly improve BoM and security in other market segments. On x86 we are also reducing code size, but this is significantly harder because of backward compatibility guarantees for x86 hardware and older operating systems.

Conclusion
The event was a great success with a lot of community and technical topics, like “How to Get Your Code Into Xen” and “The Art of Virtualizing Cache Maintenance.” Find the playlist for the full conference here. Additionally, our design sessions focused on architecture, embedded and safety, security, performance, and working practices and processes. You can find what was discussed, and next steps with these areas on our wiki.

If you want to stay abreast of where and when the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit will be held next year, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Xen Project Matrix

Xen Project Hypervisor: Virtualization and Power Management are Coalescing into an Energy-Aware Hypervisor

Power management in the Xen Project Hypervisor historically targets server applications to improve power consumption and heat management in data centers reducing electricity and cooling costs. In the embedded space, the Xen Project Hypervisor faces very different applications, architectures and power-related requirements, which focus on battery life, heat, and size.

Although the same fundamental principles of power management apply, the power management infrastructure in the Xen Project Hypervisor requires new interfaces, methods, and policies tailored to embedded architectures and applications. This post recaps Xen Project power management, how the requirements change in the embedded space, and how this change may unite the hypervisor and power manager functions. Read the full article on Linux.com here.

Xen Project Announces Schedule for its Annual Developer and Design Summit

Today, we are excited to announce the program and speakers for the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit. The summit brings together developers, engineers, and Xen Project power users for in-person collaboration and educational presentations. The event will take place in Nanjing Jiangning, China from June 20 -22, 2018.

This is the fifth annual Xen Project Summit with presentations and panels focusing on hypervisor performance and development, security, automotive and much more. The conference will kick-off with a weather report from Lars Kurth, chairperson of the Xen Project and director of open source at Citrix.

At last year’s Xen Project Developer Summit in Budapest, Hungary.

A sample of presentations include:

  • Sung-Min Lee, principal engineer at Samsung Electronics, will present a production-ready automotive virtualization solution with Xen.
  • Marek Marczykowski-Górecki, senior systems developer, Invisible Things Lab, will present on linux-based device model stubdomains in Qubes OS.
  • Julien Grall, senior software virtualization engineer at Arm, will share capabilities that were added to the latest revision of the ARmv7-A architectures and how Arm has been improving virtualization support with incremental versions of the Armv8 architecture.
  • Felipe Huici, chief researcher at NEC, and Florian Schmidt, research scientist at NEC, will co-present on Unikraft, a sub-project of the Xen Project aimed at automativing the process of building customized unikernels tailored to a specific applications.
  • Bo Zhang, business analyst at Huawei, will introduce Huawei Cloud’s optimization on the Xen platform to solve regular problems that occur in customer scenarios

You can view the full schedule here.

Beyond panels and presentations, the Xen Project will be running design sessions that share a similar format to Xen Project hackathons. Attendees of the conference have the opportunity to propose design sessions during the conference. Current design topics already include Making Safety Certifications for Xen Easier, From Hobbyist to Maintainer: Why and How and Reworking x86 in Xen (Current and Future Plans).

If you’ve never attended a Xen Project Developer and Design Summit, check out last year’s presentations to get a better feel for the event.

A special thank you Citrix for being a diamond sponsor of the summit.

 

Summer = Xen Project Internships!

We received a lot of amazing submissions for our summer Outreachy internship program and have accepted Dafna Hirschfeld to join us in creating new execution targets for Unikraft. Unikraft is a Xen Project incubation project that aims to simplify the process of building unikernels through a unified and customizable code base.

Currently, Unikraft supports building images that can be executed as a virtual machine on Xen and KVM, and as an ELF binary within the Linux user space environment. Support for more execution targets is done by providing more platform libraries that can be chosen during build. Dafna will be fairly free to choose a platform, perhaps based on familiarity or curiosity. Examples for platform choice include bare-metal, ARM, X86_64, VMware, Microsoft Hyper-V, and bhyve.

If you are unfamiliar with Outreachy, it provides three-month internships for people from groups traditionally underrepresented in tech. Interns work remotely with mentors from Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) communities. Xen Project interns have later gone on to work at companies like Oracle, Google and Citrix.

In addition to Outreachy, we are excited to announce a few new interns that will be working on the Xen Project hypervisor through Google Summer of Code. Although the Xen Project was not a mentoring organisation for Google Summer of Code this year, FreeBSD and The Honeypot Project were and had a number of Xen Project related projects. Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development.

Interns that are a part of the Google Summer of Code and working on pushing Xen Project technologies forward include:

  • Kristaps Civkulis who will be working on enabling the EFI loader to load FreeBSD Xen Dom0. There are two parts to the project – you can learn more about it here. The organization supporting this is the FreeBSD Project.
  • Pratyush Yadav who will import the Xen grant-table bus_dma(9) handlers from OpenBSD. FreeBSD Project is supporting Pratyush.
  • Lele Ma who will Port LibVMI to Xen MiniOS. In this project, the core functionalities of the LibVMI will be ported to Xen MiniOS. After ported, Xen MiniOS will have the basic capabilities of introspecting the memory of other guest virtual machines. Honeynet Project is supporting Lele.
  • Honeynet Project is also supporting Stewart Sentanoe who is working on stealth monitoring with Xen altp2m based on previous work that has been done – see here. And Ulrich Fourier who is working on adding support for ARM introspection, which is a follow-up to a 2016 GSoC project that developed altp2m support to Xen on ARM.

Working in open source is a great way to start your career in technology. In a recent survey from HackerRank 84% of respondents (including CEOs, CTOs and company founders) said they look to an applicant’s GitHub project work as an indicator of a prospective employee’s on-the-job skills.

We want to thank everyone who applied to our Outreachy scholarship, and look forward to sharing the accomplishments of our interns. Welcome to open source!

 

Call for Proposals Open for the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit Happening in June!

Registration and the call for proposals are open for the Xen Project Developer and Design Summit 2018, which will be held in Nanjing Jiangning, China from June 20 – 22, 2018. The Xen Project Developer and Design Summit combines the formats of Xen Project Developer Summits with Xen Project Hackathons, and brings together the Xen Project’s community of developers and power users.

Submit a Talk

Do you have an interesting use case around Xen Project technology or best practices around the community? There’s a wide variety of topics we are looking for, including cloud, server virtualization, unikernels, automotive, security, embedded environments, network function virtualization (NFV), and more. You can find all the suggested topics for presentations and panels here (make sure you select the Topics tab).

Several formats are being accepted for speaking proposals, including:

  • Presentations and panels
  • Interactive design and problem solving sessions. These sessions can be submitted as part of the CFP, but we will reserve a number of design sessions to be allocated during the event.
    • Proposers of design sessions are expected to host and moderate design sessions following the format we have used at Xen Project Hackathons. If you have not participated in these in the past, check out past event reports from 2016, 2015 and 2013.

Never talked at a conference before? Don’t worry! We encourage new speakers to submit for our events!

Here are some dates to remember for submissions and in general:

  • CFP Close: April 13, 2018
  • CFP Notifications: April 30 – May 2, 2018
  • Schedule Announced: May 3, 2018
  • Event: June 20 – 22, 2018

Registration

Come join us for this event, and if you register by May 2, you’ll get an early bird discount of $125/ 800 Yuan Travel stipends are available for students or individuals that are not associated with a company. If you have any questions, please send a note to community.manager@xenproject.org.

Curious about last year’s event? Check out a few of our presentations last year here!